Top 10 Read Bunting Blogs of 2017

Which Magnetic Separator Articles Proved Popular in 2017?

In 2017, we have posted 48 articles and news stories on a wide range of subjects from metal contaminated food, environmental issues of plastic waste, and review of major trade shows such as Waste 17 and Interplas.

But which ones proved to be the most popular?

Here’s the top 10.

10 – Magnetic Separation Myths – You Can Block a Magnetic Field

The 8th of 10 myths on Magnetic Separation was published in February and highlighting how difficult it is to block out a magnetic field.

9 – Where are Metal Separators Positioned in a Plastics Plant?

This is one of the ‘Perfect Plant’ series of blogs, first published in March 2016, assessing a typical plastic plant and highlighting the best locations to remove metal contamination.

Perfect Plastics Plant

8 – ‘Ingesting Metal Fragments Can Cause Injury’ states FDA

On their website, the US FDA review the issue of metal contamination and highlight the dangers of consuming food products contaminated with metal.

7 – Cases of Metal Found in Food

For the UK’s Food Safety Week in June, we looked at recent high profile cases of metal being found in food and investigate how these problems could have been prevented.

6 – Magnetic Separation Myths – It Is Easy to Clean a Magnetic Separator

The 10th of the 10 Magnetic Separator myths was published in March, looking at the difficulties of cleaning high strength magnets and providing some simple solutions.

5 – Getting Metal Out of Recycled Tyres and Rubber

This article, assessing the best ways to remove metal from shredded rubber, was first published in April 2016, but still remains popular.

4 – How do you Separate Stainless Steel?

This article was published in April 2015 and highlights the challenges and solutions of separating stainless steel.

3 – 3 UK Waste and Recycling Facts

In the week prior to the UK’s recycling and waste show RWM17, we investigated three facts on how the UK handles and recycles our waste.

2 – Bunting Acquires Master Magnets

In January, we announced the acquisition of one of the UK’s leading manufacturers of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors, Master Magnets.

1 – What is an Axial and Radial Magnetic Field?

Radial Magnetic Field Bunting Magnetics

Despite the huge news coverage and interest in the acquisition of Master Magnets, the most read blog in 2017 was an article first published in August 2016.  The technical article explains the difference between an Axial and Radial Magnetic Field when used in a Magnetic Separator such as a Drum Magnet or Magnetic Pulley.

We hope that you’ve enjoyed reading our news and blogs in 2017 and please keep reading in 2018!

For further information on Metal Separation or to assess the right Magnetic Separator or Metal Detector for a specific application, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Top 10 Blogs Bunting 2017

Our 2017 Review

A Look Back at Our News & Blogs from 2017

2017 has been another busy and exciting time for Bunting Magnetics Europe with some great news stories.  In this blog we look back at the past 12 months and review the stories that hit our headlines.

January

bunting_master_magnetsWe started the year by announcing that Bunting had acquired leading UK Magnetic Separator and Metal Detection company Master Magnets.  This changed the Magnetic Separator landscape in Europe.

At the same time, the Bunting team was exhibiting at the Arabplast exhibition in Dubai.  The plastics focused event was attended and visited by plastics professionals across the region.  Sales were even made on the stand!

Our 7th of our 8 Magnetic Separator Myths examined the impossibility of achieving 100% metal separation.

To finish off January, we announced record sales in 2016 despite the backdrop of Brexit and political uncertainty.

February

We started the month with our 8th Magnetic Separator myth, asking if it was possible to block a magnetic field.

Bunting also joined the British Plastics Federation, reflecting our longtime involvement in the sector providing metal separation solutions.

Bunting at Exposolidos 2017

Our exhibition focus in the month was Exposolidos in Spain with our local representative SMED Tecnica.

In February, we also asked the question of whether our Environmental future is simple down to design?  This was written in response to the growing awareness of the environmental impact of waste that would gradually intensify through the year.

We finished off the month with the launch of the Teardrop Tube Magnet, ideal for use in fine powders where bridging might be an issue.

March

The strength of a Magnetic Separator is often expressed in ‘gauss’.  However, the vast majority of people are unable to measure gauss and so we showed a simple practical way to check the magnetic power using a simple spring balance.

Our 9th Magnetic Separator myth highlighted the dangers of strong Magnets and our 10th myth looked at ways to easily and safely clean captured metal off  Magnetic Separators.

We also investigated a US FDA report stating the ‘Ingesting Metal Fragments Can Cause Injury‘.

In March, we exhibited at the Southern Manufacturing and Electronics show in Farnborough UK.

April

Metal is commonly found in spices and we examined a typical plant and identified the best locations for Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors.

We also reported that we sold a record number of Plate Magnets in 2016 for export to Indonesia and 28 In-Line Magnets to a German baby food producer.

New Bunting Sales EmployeesWith the continued growth of the business, we were thrilled to announce the appointment of two new sales engineers, Tom Higginbottom and Gordon Kerr.

In April, UK supermarket Morrisons was hit by a metal-in-food scare and we looked at how this could have happened and ways in which such a problem could have been prevented.

May

Our Food Safety theme continued in May when, during a metal separation survey, we found large amounts of metal safely captured when processing rice.  Our Perfect Plant review assessed the best methods and equipment location to ensure that metal is removed from Processed Vegetables.

Exports continued to proved successful with the shipment of a HFS Drawer Magnet to a Plastics recycling company in France.

Our technical review in May reviewed the effect of high temperatures on Rare Earth Magnetic Separators.

June

There was a political flavour to news in June after the UK’s general election and we investigated what the leading parties were promising with regards to the environment.  At the same time, Bunting and Master Magnets were jointly exhibiting at Waste 17, a major UK recycling show in Manchester.

The week after, Bunting supported local representative BMS France at the FIP Solution Plastique exhibition in Lyon, France.

To mark the UK’s Food Safety Week, we reviewed recent cases of ‘metal’-in-food’ and the potential implications for the manufacturer, sales outlet, and customer.

July

Denis_Elkins_Bunting_Magnetics_Europe-2176In July, we were thrilled to announce the successful transition to ISO9001 2015 Quality and the ISO14001 2015 Environmental Standards.

In the media there was increasing attention on the issue of plastic waste in the environment and we commented on the necessity of a global strategy for Plastic Waste.

August

The environmental theme continued in August asking if the UK could realistically increase their metal packaging recycling rate by 10% by 2020.

September

As a prelude to RWM17, the UK’s largest waste and recycling show, we looked at 3 UK Waste and Recycling Facts such as asking how much waste do we actually generate?

Bunting Master Magnets at RWM17

After exhibiting at RWM, there were many questions being asked by exhibitors and visitors about the future of the event despite the importance of recycling and the global waste problem.

October

Bunting Magnetics Europe at Interplas 2017

The UK’s leading plastics show, Interplas, is held every 3 years and, as in previous years, it was very well supported by both exhibitors and visitors.  The environmental issues associated with plastic waste was gathering momentum.

Removing metal from fine powders can be extremely difficult and we produced a technical report looking at the best techniques and ideal equipment.

Tom Higginbottom attended the successful Bulk Solids & Powders show SyMas in Poland with the local Bunting representative TEKPRO.

November

The Manufacturing and Engineering industries have been concerned about the lack of young engineers and hopefully initiatives such as Tomorrow’s Engineers Week will help address this issue.

We were also excited to report two consecutive record sales months in September and October.  2017 was proving to be as successful as 2016.

Our latest Perfect Plant review focused on the brewing of beer and ensuring that all metal is removed to protect delicate processing equipment and the taste of the beer.

December

Pantomine BlogThe BBC TV series Blue Planet had highlighted the global problem of plastic waste in our oceans.  However, as the pressure increased on the plastics sector, we asked whether Plastic was the Pantomime Villain of the recycling world?

We hope you have enjoyed reading our news and blogs in 2017.  If there are any topics that you would like reviewed, then please get in touch and send an email to Paul our press officer (press@buntingeurope.com).

For further information on Magnetic Separators or Metal Detectors please contact the Bunting team on:

10 Magnetic Separator Myths

Magnetic Separator Fact and Fiction

Trying to ascertain what and whose Magnetic Separator will provide the best metal separation can be difficult.  Often, the decision is made even more difficult with claims and counterclaims about levels of Gauss and what the Magnetic Separator can actually capture.  In this blog, we try to dispel these myths and make selecting the right Magnetic Separator a little easier.

Myth 1 – You Should Always Use the Strongest Magnetic Separator

Strongest is always best, or is it?  Commonly, companies will call and request a quote for a Magnetic Separator with the strongest magnet.  But is that actually what they need?

magnetic-pull-test-kit-bunting-magnetics-blog

Myth 2 – All Rare Earth Magnetic Separators Are The Same

A client has a metal contamination problem and needs to install the most suitable magnetic separation.  The metal is small and so they believe that a Magnetic Separator with Rare Earth Neodymium Magnets is what they need as this produces the strongest magnetic field.  So he picks up the phone and orders a Rare Earth Magnetic Separator and his problem is solved.  Or is it?

Myth 3 – The Highest Gauss Magnetic Separator Is Always The Best, Or Is It?

On a regular basis, we will receive an enquiry requesting a Magnetic Separator of a specific size.  However, it is only when the enquiry also requests a specific Gauss figure that it all starts becoming a little complicated.

Myth 4 – Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, Or Is It?

The vast majority of stainless steel used in plants processing foodstuffs, chemicals, plastics and handling bulk materials whether in solid, liquid or powder form, is non-magnetic.  Or is it?bunting-ffs-magnet-with-stainless-steel-washer-and-wingnut-0086

 

Myth 5 – Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?

It is a question we frequently get asked:  When will the Magnetic Separator start losing its magnetic strength?  In normal operating conditions, a magnetic separator will not lose any magnetic strength.  However, there are occasions when other factors do affect the magnetic strength.

Myth 6 – Is A Magnetic Field Uniform Along the Surface of a Tube Magnet?

On a typical Cartridge or Tube Magnet, the magnetic field on the surface is not even along the whole length.  As shown on the photograph, magnetically attracted materials agglomerate at specific points along the length.  So why is that?

Myth 7 – We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation

In the perfect world, installing a Magnetic Separator will enable 100% metal separation with 0% product loss.  However, is this even remotely possible?

Myth 8 – You Can Block a Magnetic Field

A common question asked by users of Magnets and Magnetic Separators is whether a Magnetic Field can be blocked in the same way that lead blocks radiation.  This can be an important issue when considering the location of a Magnetic Separator and whether it is near instrumentation, control panels, or is in an area freely accessible by employees.

horseshow-magnet-1

Myth 9 – Magnetic Separators Are Not Dangerous?!??

In school science, we learn about magnetism by playing with small permanent magnets.  It is fun, seeing how iron filings are affected by the magnetic field.  Our bodies are also constantly exposed to the Earth’s Magnetic Field.

So how can Magnets be dangerous?

Myth 10 – It Is Easy To Clean a Magnetic Separator

The Magnetic Separator has done its job and captured that potentially damaging item of ferrous metal.  Now it is time to remove the captured metal from the surface of the Magnetic Separator.  It should be easy, shouldn’t it?  However, due to the high magnetic power cleaning metal off a Magnetic Separator is becoming increasing difficult and a health and safety concern.

For further details on Magnetic Separator Myths or to discuss any Metal Contamination and Separation issue, please contact our technical sales team on:

100-with-a-smile

 

It Is Easy To Clean A Magnetic Separator

10th of 10 Magnetic Separation Myths

The Magnetic Separator has done its job and captured that potentially damaging item of ferrous metal.  Now it is time to remove the captured metal from the surface of the Magnetic Separator.  It should be easy, shouldn’t it?  However, due to the high magnetic power cleaning metal off a Magnetic Separator is becoming increasing difficult and a health and safety concern.

So, is it possible to make the cleaning process easier?

One of the most used Magnetic Separators is the Cartridge or Tube Magnet.  The diameter of the tube is commonly 1 “ or 25.4mm and the length can vary enormously.  They are used in a wide range of Magnetic Separator designs such as Drawer and Grate Magnets and can be supplied in a range of strengths for different applications such as:Bunting Cartridge Tube Magnetic Separators-6256

  • Ferrite – The lowest strength and good for general tramp iron such as nuts and bolts
  • Rare Earth – The strongest magnet and is ideal for fine ferrous contamination and abraded stainless steel;

As already mentioned, the most common problem for users of high strength, Rare Earth Tube Magnets is cleaning.  The magnetic field is so strong that removing captured metal from the surface of the Tube Magnet can be very difficult and a health and safety risk.  So how can the captured metal be removed?  Here are a few examples, some of which may be a little unorthodox:

  • Use a heavy cloth and push the captured metal along the tube surface to the non-magnetic end where it will then discharge. A heavy cloth is recommended as shards of metal may penetrate the cloth;
  • Use heavy duty gloves and a similar technique to the heavy duty cloth, although using PPE for such applications should be discussed with your Health and Safety Officer;
  • Use putty or a similar substance as the metal on the surface of the Tube Magnet becomes embedded in the putty. You may need to move the putty along the Tube surface from points of high to low magnetic intensity;
  • Fit a rubber sleeve over the Tube Magnet before installing into the process line.  Metal is captured on the outside of the rubber sleeve and when it is rolled off the Tube Magnet, the metal is removed at the same time;Bunting Cartridge Tube Magnetic Separators Putty & Gloves

 

Techniques that are not recommended are:

  • Using high pressure water. This may move metal around the surface of the Tube Magnet from the point where the water is striking the surface to the opposite side, but does not effectively clean the magnet;
  • Using high air pressure, where the same problem as with high pressure water occurs;
  • Using high pressure water and air also poses health and safety risks;
  • Rubbing metal off with an unprotected hand. This can result in injury with metal becoming embedded in the surface of the skin;

Cleaning the Cartridge or Tube Magnet is important as it ensures that optimum separation performance is maintained.  Any cleaning process will need discussion with your Health & Safety Officer and we provide free help and support.  For further details on cleaning or on the range of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors supplied by Bunting, please contact our technical sales team on:

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?
  7. We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation
  8. You Can Block a Magnetic Field
  9. Magnetic Separators are Not Dangerous?!!?

Magnetic Separators Are Not Dangerous!??

9th of 10 Magnetic Separation Myths

In school science, we learn about magnetism by playing with small permanent magnets.  It is fun, seeing how iron filings are affected by the magnetic field.  Our bodies are also constantly exposed to the Earth’s Magnetic Field.

So how can Magnets be dangerous?

In the 1980s, the concept of permanent magnetism changed with the development of the ‘Rare Earth Magnet‘.  The new permanent magnets produced a Magnetic Field and Force far higher than traditional Ferrite or Ceramic Magnets.

Since the 1980s, the magnetic strength of Rare Earth Magnets, like the Neodymium Iron Boron type, has increased.  Tube or Cartridge Magnets (as used in Magnetic Separators like Grate Magnets and Drawer Magnets) commonly use Rare Earth Magnets.  The high permanent magnetic force enables the attraction and capture of very fine or weakly magnetic materials.  This is vitally important when processing and producing plastics, foodstuffs or pharmaceuticals.

Bunting Magnetics Europe Ltd FFS Magnet-0095

But are they dangerous?

A strong Tube or Cartridge ‘Rare Earth’ Magnet has a surface magnetic reading of around 12,000 gauss.  The ‘Ferrite’ type has a surface field of 1,500 gauss.  In terms of magnetic force, the difference is enormous.

However, the real test comes when using a spring balance to pull a small steel ball bearing off the surface of the Tube Magnet.  When the steel ball is pulled off the Ferrite Tube Magnet, the force needed is negligible.  On testing the Rare Earth Tube Magnet, over 2kg of force is required.

Now we know that magnets attract.  So if two Rare Earth Tube Magnets are placed near each other, they will naturally want to go together.  The speed of the two items moving towards each other increases until they meet and the resultant collision is substantial.  If a hand or finger is in between the two Tube Magnets, the force of the attraction could result in serious injury.  People have been known to break or badly bruise fingers just by having them caught between two attracting Rare Earth Magnets.

So, the answer is a loud yes.  Magnets can be dangerous.  Luckily, advice and guidance is provided when advising users about Magnetic Separators.  And many Magnetic Separator designs include excellent safety features.

For further information on Rare Earth Magnets, Magnetic Separators, and Safety Advice, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?
  7. We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation
  8. You Can Block a Magnetic Field

You Can Block a Magnetic Field

8th of 10 Magnetic Separation Myths

A common question asked by users of Magnets and Magnetic Separators is whether a Magnetic Field can be blocked in the same way that lead blocks radiation.  This can be an important issue when considering the location of a Magnetic Separator and whether it is near instrumentation, control panels, or is in an area freely accessible by employees.

The simple answer is that it is not possible to totally ‘block’ a magnetic field.  The essence of a magnet, as determined by nature, is that magnetic field lines must terminate on the opposite pole and, therefore, there is no way to stop them.

tube-cartridge-magnets-bunting-magnetics-4

However, often it is necessary to protect equipment from magnetic fields and this is achieved by re-routing the magnetic field.  This is otherwise known as ‘Magnetic Shielding’ and is achieved by casing the equipment requiring protection inside a structure that is made from or comprises of a material that has a very high magnetic permeability such as steel.  The magnetic field then flows along such that material, channeling the lines of magnetic field away from the components that require protecting, such as delicate electronics.

Not being able to completely block a Magnetic Field also causes difficulties for transporting Magnetic Separators and Magnetic Assemblies.  Many overseas customers ask if a particular Magnetic Separator can be transported by air.  Due to the inherent safety risk, there are strict regulations on how magnetically charged equipment and components can be transported due to concerns about interference with aircraft instrumentation.  Although such interference is extremely unlikely (due to most magnets having very shallow fields that do not even extend out of their packaging) there are guidelines that state:

  • Where possible the magnets are positioned with the north pole next to another’s south pole;
  • Thin sheets of steel are packed around the magnets in order to shunt the magnetic field and restrict it from penetrating outside of the box.  .

These guidelines are often possible to follow for small Magnets and Magnetic Separators, however transporting larger Magnetic Separators can very difficult and, if possible at all, exceptionally expensive.bunting-vulcanis-1139-2

This technique of channeling magnetic fields is actually used when designing Magnetic Separators such as the Overband Cross Belt Magnet, where magnetised blocks inside a stainless steel case have a thick steel backbar welded on one side to force the magnetic field to project away and in one direction.  This is a positive way of channeling the magnetic field to achieve the specific objective of picking up steel and magnetically susceptible materials.

For further information on Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Separators, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?
  7. We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation

We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation

7th of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

In the perfect world, installing a Magnetic Separator will enable 100% metal separation with 0% product loss.  However, is this even remotely possible?100-with-a-smile

Often as part of a project specification, there will be a question asking about the level and percentage of metal separation.  In some projects, the expected metal separation target is even stated.

The response from Magnetic Separator suppliers will include a statement regarding the level and percentage of Metal Separation, often without any qualification.  So what should the answer be?

There are a number of questions that need asking before the level of Metal Separation can be estimated and these include:

  1. What is the Metal Separation objective? Is it to remove problematic metal and protect processing equipment as when processing food, pharmaceuticals, or plastics?  Or is to recover as much metal as possible, which may be the objective in a recycling operation?
  2. How much product or non-metallic material can be lost? The non-metallic material might be the product or it could be the waste.  It is commonly found that higher Metal Separation rates are often accompanied by a higher loss of the non-metallic materials;
  3. What purity of end product is required? In recycling, the aim is to achieve recovery of metal, but at what point does the value of the recovered metal become affected by the level of contamination?  In the food and plastics industry, the final product quality is paramount;f33a6163
  4. How is the stated Metal Separation figure in terms of separation and/or purity monitored once the equipment is installed? Commonly, very high separation percentages are quoted by suppliers as it is well recognised that once the equipment has been installed the actual separation rate will never be checked;

Just asking these four questions enables a really good initial assessment of the application.  Then it is possible to make a recommendation in terms of the design of Magnetic Separator, and the mode of installation and operation.

Importantly, if a Metal Separation target is a key part of the contract, ensure that there is an agreed process to check the level of separation once the Magnetic Separator is installed.

With regards to the original statement, ‘We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation’, this is a claim made by only the brave or ill-advised.  Processing materials such as food, recyclables, minerals, aggregates, chemicals and plastics can be carefully controlled, but is always subject to variations that can affect any part of the process including the level of metal separation.  Even by installing multiple magnetic separators of different designs, achieving a 100% Metal Separation is simply a myth.

For further information on Metal Separation or to assess the right Magnetic Separator for an application, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?

Is a Magnetic Field Uniform along the Surface of a Tube Magnet?

6th of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

On a typical Cartridge or Tube Magnet, the magnetic field on the surface is not even along the whole length.  As shown on the photograph, magnetically attracted materials agglomerate at specific points along the length.  So why is that?

metal-contamination-on-magnets

A Cartridge or Tube Magnetic Separator is constructed by placing an alternating series of magnet slugs and steel discs inside a stainless steel tube.  Each magnet slug has a North and South pole and is inserted into the tube so that the South Pole faces another South pole and visa-versa.  When the magnet slugs are very strong, as in the case of the Bunting Cartridge Magnetic Separators which use high strength Neodymium Iron Boron or Rare Earth Magnets, the assembly requires a great deal of skill and knowledge.  In between each magnet slug is a steel disc which acts as a magnetic pole, intensifying the magnetic field.  As shown on the photograph below, the magnetic field is drawn into each steel pole positioned between each magnet slug, with magnetic field lines arcing from the North to the South Pole.

magnetics-on-a-tube-magnet

Any magnetically susceptible particle moving into the lines of magnetic field will be attracted to the point of highest intensity, which is at the nearest pole.  Hence why magnetically captured particles are then seen to agglomerate at specific points along the surface of a Cartridge or Tube Magnetic Separators.  They have been held at the point of the highest magnetic field, which is between the magnet slugs and actually on the steel pole piece.

Hence why a magnetic field is not uniform along the surface of a Magnetic Separator like the Tube Magnet.

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series of blogs include:

When assessing the right Magnetic Separator for an application, please speak with one of our trained sales engineers who can assess your requirements and recommend the Magnetic Separator that is right for you.

For more information please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

bunting-cartridge-tube-magnetic-separators-4

Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time

5th of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

It is a question we frequently get asked:  When will the Magnetic Separator start losing its magnetic strength?  In normal operating conditions, a magnetic separator will not lose any magnetic strength.  However, there are occasions when other factors do affect the magnetic strength.  Such instances include:

  1. The use of bonded Rare Earth Magnets. These are lower in cost to manufacture and therefore cheaper to purchase.  They are supplied by many companies, stating that the magnets are ‘Rare Earth’.  However, as the magnet is only bonded (i.e. bonded together using a resin) it is not as strong or stable as being sintered.  ‘Ceramic’ Rare Earth Magnets, that have been produced using heat, are more stable and are what Bunting and other reputable magnetic separator suppliers use in their magnetic separators.  Bonded Magnets are ideal for many other applications;
  2. Physical damage. If a Magnetic Separator is dropped or hit, then this can result in the magnets inside breaking and this will affect the magnetic power.  Such damage often occurs when a Magnetic Separator is being cleaned.  Unknowingly, the Magnetic Separator is returned to the process line with the operator totally unaware that the magnetic separation capabilities have been seriously compromised.  Regular checks on the magnetic strength of the Magnetic Separators is recommended as part of an annual review and audit;
  3. Exposure to heat. When Rare Earth Magnets are exposed to heat over 80°C, there is a reduction in the magnetic strength.  When the temperature reduces, the magnetic field can recover.  However, if the temperature is very high then the magnetic strength will never recover back to the original state.  Typically Magnetic Separators are exposed to high temperatures if a process line is being cleaned using steam.  There are special Rare Earth Magnetic materials that are specially produced for high temperature applications, with Samarium-Cobalt being used in extreme circumstances;

Understanding the ability of a Magnetic Separator to hold its magnetic strength will help during the purchasing and maintenance processes.  Our Sales Team can provide help and assistance on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

 

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

bunting-ffs-magnet-with-stainless-steel-washer-and-wingnut-0086

 

Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or Is It?

4th of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

The vast majority of stainless steel used in plants processing foodstuffs, chemicals, plastics and handling bulk materials whether in solid, liquid or powder form, is non-magnetic.

Or is it?bunting-magnetics-europe-ltd-ffs-magnet-0086

Traditionally, Magnetic Separators were installed to remove any ferrous metal.  Today, this has expanded to include any magnetically susceptible material, including magnetic plastic, used for gloves and even tools.  Magnetically attractable metals come in the form of steel or iron and are strongly attracted to the surface of a magnet.

However, as the attractive strength of permanent magnets, such as Rare Earth Cartridge Magnets has increased, analysis of the captured metal has shown that stainless steel is present.  So how is that so?

Most stainless steel ending up in a process line originates from broken or worn processing equipment and is often small in size.  During the process of being broken or worn, this abraded stainless steel has been work-hardened.  This results in a slight change in the metal causing it to be very weakly magnetic.

With the right design and strength of Magnetic Separator, weakly magnetically susceptible materials such stainless steel can be attracted to the magnet face and captured.  Even ‘non-magnetic’ stainless steel bolts are found to be very weakly magnetic on the head of the bolt, especially if a spanner or socket has been used for tightening and loosening.

So even though a Magnetic Separator will not capture all stainless steel, those with a high magnetic attractive force (eg Rare Earth Magnets) will attract and capture a high percentage.  This is ideal when trying to reduce the amount of metal passing through final stage Metal Detection.

Other articles in the series of blogs looking at Magnetic Separator Myths include:

For more information or a site review by our trained sales engineers, please contact our team on:

Phone:  01442 875081

Email:  sales@buntingeurope.com

Via the website