Plastics Positivity at Technivation

Polymer Training and Innovation Centre Hosts UK Plastics Sector Professionals

The Technivation conference, hosted by the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford (18th April 2018), attracted delegates from across the UK plastics sector.

The Polymer Training and Innovation Centre (PITC) provides training for engineers working with plastics and has an extensive range of working equipment including moulding machines, pneumatic conveying systems, and magnetic separators.

Bunting Europe at TechnivationAt Technivation, there were talks from machinery manufacturers and also an industry update from the British Plastics Federation.  BPF Membership Services Director, Stephen Hunt, highlighted a change in the awareness and public perception of plastics since the airing of the BBC Blue Planet II series at the end of 2017.  The BPF have been working hard to clarify misconceptions about plastics, highlighting that plastic is vital in the manufacture of so many products including cars, medical equipment, and IT.  They are presently working closely with the UK Government on the proposed tax for single use plastics, which closes on 18th May 2018.

As Stephen Hunt explained, the plastics sector is the 8th largest exporting industry in the UK with a turnover of £25.5 billion.  The sector is also the 2nd largest employer in the manufacturing industry.  He also highlighted how waste from the USA and European Union combined only contributes 2% to the amount of plastic waste found in our oceans.

Delegates at Technivation had the opportunity to tour the training facility and meet representatives from equipment manufacturers including Summit Systems, Kistler, Arburg, and Staubli.  Tom Higginbottom, Bunting’s Sales Engineer, was demonstrating how to effectively remove metal from the plastics process using a combination of a FF Drawer Filter Magnet and Quicktron Metal Detector.

“At Technivation it was really good to be able to demonstrate how to remove metal and also to show how the equipment is actually installed on a working moulding machine,” explained Tom.  “We supplied the FF Drawer Filter Magnets to PTIC so that the importance of metal removal is included in the training programmes.”

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Bunting Europe at Technivation

Polymer Training and Innovation Centre Protected by Bunting Drawer Filter Magnet

Magnetic Separator Technology for Plastics Training

The Polymer Training & Innovation Centre in Telford has added a Bunting Magnetics Drawer Filter Magnet to the range of equipment at their plastics manufacturing training facility.  The FF Drawer Filter Magnet attracts and captures any fine and coarse magnetically susceptible materials that enter the plastics manufacturing process.

Bunting FF Grate Magnet
A Bunting Magnetics Europe FF Grate Magnet included in a plastics production line at the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford

The Polymer Training & Innovation Centre provides polymer training and consultancy, specialising in injection moulding, blow moulding and extrusion training.  They are a technical training and consultancy business that is owned by City of Wolverhampton College.

At their Telford training facility, the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre has working production-sized plastics manufacturing equipment for injection moulding, blow moulding, thermoforming, materials handling, and a wide range of other important ancillary equipment.

Technical Trainer, Andrew Dermody, explained the importance of trainees having practical training on the equipment.

“We have great support from the industry and equipment manufacturers such as Bunting.  This support means that we can deliver practical training, with a hands-on approach, and that is the best way for our delegates to learn.  Having the Drawer Filter Magnet installed exactly as it would be in a production plant, is an ideal way to show our students best-practice and highlight the importance of metal removal.”

Bunting FF Grate Magnet

The training facility at Telford was refurbished in early 2017 and Bunting supplied the FF Drawer Filter Magnet in March 2018.  The FF Grate Magnet is bolted onto the bottom flange of a Summit Systems fed hopper.  The Magnetic Separator has a transparent front plate so that operators are able to see the material passing through or held within the system.  Virgin plastic beads fall from the hopper through two rows of high strength Tube Magnets, which attract and hold any magnetically susceptible materials.  The Tube Magnets use ultra-strong, permanent, Neodymium Rare Earth Magnets.  The cleaned plastic beads are then fed into the Engel injection moulding machine.  Removing all metal contamination ensures that the final plastic product is free from defects and reduces the amount of waste and potential damage to moulding machines.

Bunting FF Grate Magnet

On a regular frequency, dictated by the amount of metal captured, the Tube Magnets are removed as one complete assembly from the housing and cleaned.  The design of the Drawer Filter Magnet means that removal of the Magnet Assembly is quick and easy, keeping maintenance times to a minimum.

“The Bunting design is good as it is very visible,” said Dermody.  “Often Magnetic Separators are placed out of sight in hoppers, which means that they can be forgotten.  In this installation, the Drawer Filter Magnet is right in front of the machine operator and the clear front allows easy visual checking of the magnets.”

Bunting also supplied Drawer Filter Magnets for use in the classroom and the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre plan to incorporate ‘metal separation’ as one of the course topics.

The Drawer Grate Magnet is widely regarded as standard for the plastics industry and Bunting has supplied thousands to plastics manufacturing operations globally.

“It is great that delegates are able to see, in practice, the importance of having good Magnetic Separation equipment in the plastics process,” said Tom Higginbottom, Bunting’s Sales Engineer.  “Even with virgin raw materials, there is always a small amount of fine ferrous metal contamination and there is always the risk of larger tramp iron that could seriously damage the injection moulding machine.”

On the 18th April 2018, the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre is staging the Technivation event at their recently upgraded training facility in Telford.  During the day there will be a series of short technical presentations, the opportunity to experience their Polymer on-line simulation software, and the chance to meet and talk with primary and secondary equipment suppliers including Bunting Magnetics.  Visitors will be able to learn more about Polymer Apprenticeship’s and Funding and discuss their organisations own training requirements.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Bunting FF Grate Magnet
A Bunting Magnetics Europe FF Grate Magnet included in a plastics production line at the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford

New UK Drinks Container Recycling Strategy Creates ‘Bottleneck’

UK Waste Plan Means More Recycling Plants

The UK Government’s announcement that people in England will soon have to pay a deposit when they buy drinks bottles and metal cans [28th March 2018] in an attempt to curb waste is expected to create a ‘bottleneck’ in the recycling chain.  Scotland has previously announced plans for a deposit return scheme and Wales has launched a study to consider it.

drinking-water-filter-singapore-1235578_960_720Other countries, including Sweden and Germany, already operate schemes where people pay a deposit when purchasing some drinking containers.

This latest announcement may be considered as a knee-jerk reaction to the global dismay about plastic waste following the airing of the Blue Planet II series.   Environment Secretary Michael Gove said there was no doubt that plastic was “wreaking havoc” on the marine environment and discarded plastic bottles and cans “end up dumped on pavements and lobbed into rivers, lakes and the sea”.

Although most people agree with the sentiment of the new policy, there are serious concerns about the UK’s ability to handle the increase in the amount of plastic waste.  The UK Government has not outlined how the recovered plastics will be recycled and how it will work financially.

Already, since China banned plastic waste imports [January 2018] there have been concerns about how the UK will manage plastic waste, especially as 2.7 million tonnes was shipped to China since 2012.  This new policy will potentially reduce the amount of plastic going to landfill, but also add to the amount of plastic waste that was previously shipped to China.  That equates to a lot of plastic waste.

Are There Enough Plastic Recycling Plants?

An increase in recovered plastic waste means that there needs to be a significant growth in the number of specialist recycling plants.  However, profitably operating a plastics recycling plant has proven to be difficult, with many plants being commissioned and then closed or sold within a very short space of time.

Bunting Metal Separation System Recapture Plastics
Metal Separation Module in a Plastics Recycling Plant in Kent

Bunting Vulcanis-1098

There has been an established network for the collection and successful recycling of steel and aluminium beverage cans for decades.  Part of the reason for the success is that both materials are easily recyclable, using a combination of Magnetic Separators and Eddy Current Separators, and converted into new steel and aluminium.  Presently, the same cannot be said for plastic.

The UK Government may decide to commit all the collected deposits to expanding and funding a network of specialist recycling plants, although where this money will go is is presently unclear.  It will be interesting to hear if there are plans to invest in the development of technology to enable successfully and financially viable mixed plastic recycling.  Also, will product designers now be forced to consider the recyclability of a product rather than the aesthetic appearance?

Certainly, a holistic plan is needed before this new initiative is put in place.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other relevant waste and recycling articles:

 

Is Recycling in UK Reaching Crisis Point?

Troubled Times for the UK and European Recycling Sectors

There appears to be a distinct disconnect between the political rhetoric and what is actually happening in the waste and recycling sector.  In the UK, Theresa May has pledged to eliminate plastic waste by 2042 and the European government has ‘declared war’ on plastic waste setting a target of having all packaging reusable or recyclable by 2030.

China WasteHowever, it has been reported [BBC News 1st March 2018] that waste recycling rates in the UK are falling for over 14 million households.  Also, China’s import restrictions on waste materials has put tremendous pressure on the recycling sector and it is anticipated that UK firms are likely to close [MRW].

The global problem of Plastic Waste has been at the top of the media agenda since the BBC’s Blue Plant II showed how it is contaminating our world and endangering our wildlife.  The noise from environmental activists and the general population has been deafening.

Surfer and Plastic WastePoliticians had to respond and announced targets for dealing with plastic waste.  However, the announcements do not include details about how these tough targets are going to be met.

In the UK, we presently recycle 29% of our plastic, although this figure is presently under debate [Industry ‘exaggerates plastics recycling success’ – BBC News 6th March 2018].  The target for 2020 is 57% and 0% by 2042.  The present recycling rate is low due to the complexity of the process and economics.  Magnetic SeparatorsEddy Current Separators and Metal Detectors remove metal and there is other technology to sort by colour and plastic type.  However, producing a useful plastic from waste that can be introduced as a raw material into primary plastic production (such as happens with aluminium and steel) is presently exceptionally difficult.  Contamination at the collection source, during transportation, and during process is one of many problems.  Until those issue are addressed, plastic waste will continue to pose a problem.

Bunting Overband Magnet over Conveyor 2

The solution has been shipping mixed waste materials to China and other countries for manual separation.  This is no longer an option, at least in China.

A cohesive plan of action is required, with the setting of realistic targets reflecting the technology and economics of waste recycling.  At present, it appears that politicians are just making statements to appease the masses.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other relevant waste and recycling articles:

Contamination Hinders Plastic Recycling

Metal Contamination is Another Problem Facing Plastic Recycling Companies

The environmental impact of poorly managing plastic waste has been in the headlines since the BBC’s Blue Planet II series was aired at the end of 2017.  In January, Theresa May made a pledge to eliminate the UK’s plastic waste by 2042, although the detail of the plan has yet to be unveiled.  Less than a week later and the EU ‘declared war on plastic waste’, announcing the intention to ensure that every piece of packaging on the continent is reusable or recyclable by 2030.

plastic-trash-in-oceans-and-waterways

Presently, there is an unprecedented negative feeling towards plastics.  However, plastic is and will continue to be one of the most versatile and useful materials available.  This versatility is down to the wide range of plastic types, as can be seen in any household.  Plastic is present in food packaging, mobile phone casings, tables, chairs, DVDs, televisions, and many other everyday items that would not exist unless made of plastic.

Certainly, product designers need to give recyclability a higher priority and this change in attitude is required for all materials and not just for plastics.  At present, plastic is the environmental villain.

Effectively managing plastic waste is not a new problem for the UK.  With the introduction of Material Reclamation Facilities (MRFs) in the 1990s, there was an abundance of segregated materials, including plastics, for which there was no end market.  These were stored or exported overseas, and there were reports of warehouses in Germany stocked full of unrecyclable waste materials.

This resulted in changes in the EU definition of ‘waste’ that prevented the easy movement of secondary materials within Europe, but this did not address the main problem.  The market for materials such as secondary plastics did not exist.  Advances have been made and there are products being made out of recycled waste plastics (e.g. furniture) and even plastic roads.

Technology has advanced, but the main problems remain.  Complex recycling plants are now able to separate different types of plastic by colour and type, but the process is not perfect.  To further complicate the problem, other non-related materials, such as metal and even building materials (e.g. concrete and bricks), contaminate the vast majority of waste plastic packaging.

Contaminated Pre-Sorted Waste

Most plastic packaging enters the recycling process as pre-sorted household waste.  The specification of what materials are mixed in a single recycling bag depends on the recycling strategy of the local council and varies considerably across the UK and Europe.

Recycled UK Bunting Magnetic Separators-3On arrival at a MRF, the collected materials are then separated into metal, plastic, cardboard, and any other materials defined within the local strategy.  Separation of these materials is achieved using either technology or, more commonly, a combination of separation equipment and human pickers.  This is a dirty, difficult, and unpopular environment in which to work.

The ability to successfully separate the materials is compromised by the presence of other waste.  These materials have been incorrectly added to recycling bags at the household or during collection and include used-nappies, food waste, paint tins, and other problematic materials.

At the MRF, metal packaging (e.g. steel and aluminium beverage and food cans) is commonly recovered using Overband Magnets positioned over the main feed conveyor prior to the picking line.  Other materials are manually handpicked and stored separately.  Up until recently, the mix of plastic packaging could then be sent to a specialist UK plastic recycling plant or overseas to countries such as China.

Contaminated Plastic Waste

Since 2012, British companies have shipped more than 2.7m tonnes of plastic scrap to mainland China and Hong Kong.  However, this only accounts for two-thirds of all the plastic waste exported from the UK.

Plastic waste sent to China is, where possible, commonly hand-sorted into individual plastic types (i.e. removing plastic tops by hand), with all other added contamination removed manually.  This involves a huge, low-paid workforce.  Similar manually based recycling operations in Europe would be prohibitively costly with unacceptable working conditions.

In December 2017, China announced that in early 2018 it will stop importing “foreign garbage” stating that such waste materials was commonly contaminated with “large amounts of dirty waste or even hazardous wastes”.

Specialist plastic packaging recycling plants in the UK have been under intense financial pressure for many years.  There have been calls for better legislation and Government support, but too many plastic recycling plants open and are then forced to close due to being financial unviable.

A typical plastic recycling operation needs a complex system of separation equipment.  The plant also needs to be able to adapt to huge variations in the nature of the delivered waste plastic.  There are also strict environmental regulations on storing and handling waste plastic.  Such plants are expensive to install and operate.

Hanbury Plastics Bunting Overband Magnet-1

Early in the process, ferrous and non-ferrous metal contamination is removed from the waste plastic using Magnetic Separators and Eddy Current Separators.  Initially, after the plastic is released from the compacted bale, the waste is fed into a primary shredder.  To protect the shredder from damage, an Overband Magnet is suspended across the feed conveyor and removes large ferrous metal.

At this stage, the type of ferrous metal contamination found in the plastic is diverse and often surprising.  It can include metal packaging miss-sorted at the MRF, heavy lumps of iron that increase the weight of the plastic bale, and metal picked up during transportation.  There have even been reports of car engine blocks.  Reasonably sized items of cast iron entering the shredder will cause significant and costly damage and result in the plant being closed until a repair is possible.

After the primary shredder, the waste plastic has been reduced in size and many contaminants liberated.  This shredded waste plastic is fed onto another Magnetic Separator, commonly a Drum Magnet or Pulley Magnet, to remove liberated smaller ferrous metals.

Metal Found in Plastic Recycling Bunting Magnetics-3The type of ferrous metal separated at this stage includes steel spanners, nuts, bolts, screws, fine metal wires, springs, iron shards, fine ferrous dust, and chunks of stainless steel.  Most of the ferrous metal was not part of the original plastic packaging and has been introduced between disposal and processing.

The cleansed plastic waste then passes over an Eddy Current Separator to remove non-ferrous metals.  Commonly separated metals include aluminium beverage cans, foils, tubes, and even window frames.

After the metal contamination has been removed, the plastic waste moves to the next stage in the plant, which could be further separation of contamination or sorting by colour or plastic type.

The high level of metal contamination highlights the challenges facing waste plastic processors.  It was one of many contaminants, not present in the original plastic packaging, that have to be removed.

Before UK and EU Government officials make recycling pledges to pacify environmentalists, they need to consider the practicalities and difficulties faced when processing waste plastic packaging.  Contamination will always be present, and is one of the reasons for exporting this difficult waste material overseas.  Reducing such contamination will make it easier to recycle waste plastic, but there is no clear strategy to achieve this goal at present.

For further information on Bunting Magnetics and Master Magnets and our range of metal separation equipment designed for the waste and recycling sector, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

This article was first published by EPPM Magazine (European Plastic Product Manufacturer) in February 2018.

 

Record Number of Exhibitions for Bunting in 2018

Where To Meet Bunting and Master Magnets in 2018

In 2018, the Bunting and Master Magnets team will be exhibiting at 14 industry shows across Europe.

“This will be our most active year for exhibitions,” said Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales.  “Being visible at exhibitions and congresses in 2016 and 2017 has been really important in building our identity and growing our sales.  We want to take our technology to our potential customers and show them what it can do.”

The full exhibition and congress schedule is:

January

Bunting at IERC Jan 1817th International Electronics Recycling Congress IERC2018 (Salzburg, Austria, 17-19 January).  The first congress of the year focused on E-waste (see the report – Changes in E Waste Management Highlighted at IERC 2018).  There was considerable interest in the Stainless Steel Separator;

April

Ceramitec (Munich, Germany, 10-13 April).  The leading international trade fair for ceramics and non-metallic minerals.  On show will be the Master Magnets range of mineral processing Magnetic Separators;

May

IFAT (Munich, Germany, 14-18 May).  The largest waste and recycling show in Europe.  Bunting now has one of the most complete ranges of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors for recycling including the:

Bunting Master Magnets at RWM17

June

Hillhead (Hillhead Quarry, Buxton, UK, 26-28 June).  The premier event for the aggregates and quarrying industry in the UK.  Master Magnets has attended for many years, exhibiting their industry-standard Metal Detectors and Overband Magnets;

July

July is a busy month with two exhibitions:

CARS (NAEC, Stoneleigh, UK, 11-12 July).  The Complete Auto Recycling Show focuses on the recovery, dismantling and recycling of the car.  Separating the metals is a vital stage of the process where companies use the Stainless Steel Separator, Eddy Current Separators, and Scrap Drum Magnets;

WasteExpo (Warwickshire Exhibition Centre, near Leamington Spa, UK 5th July).  The waste and skip trade exhibition run by Skip Hire Magazine where we are headline sponsors alongside Master Magnets.

September

RWM (NEC, Birmingham, UK, 12-13 September).  The largest waste and recycling exhibition in the UK.  Bunting and Master Magnets have been long-term supporters of the show and will have working Magnetic Separators on the stand.

October

Fakuma (Friedrichshafen, Germany, 16-20 October).  One of the leading plastics technology events in the world.  Bunting will be exhibiting Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors used to remove metal contamination during the virgin plastic production process and also separators used during plastics recycling.

November

This will be a busy month for overseas exhibitions with events in Italy and France.

Ecomondo (Rimini, Italy, 6-9 November).  An international event with an innovative format that brings together all sectors of the circular economy in a single platform: from material and energy recovery to sustainable development.  The show is the ideal platform to promote Magnetic Separation equipment used in the recycling sector and we will be supporting our new representative, Ital Goods.;

Emballage (Paris, France, 26-29 November).  The international trade show gathers together industry stakeholders from the food, liquids, cosmetics, beauty, luxury goods, healthcare, pharmaceutical, retail and consumer goods sectors, offering them 4 days of meetings, demonstrations, innovation and presentations.  We will be on the stand of our local distributor, Pronix.  Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors are used extensively in the processing industries;

Pollutec (Lyon, France, 27-30 November).  The international trade show for environmental and energy stakeholders working for economic performance.  The final recycling focused event of 2018 and we will be supporting our local distributor BMS France;

December

img_1144Plast Eurasia (Istanbul, Turkey, 5-8 December).  The major plastic show for Turkey and the Middle East.  Bunting has exhibited previously and will be helping visitors solve their metal contamination problems.  As in 2016, we will be on the stand of our local representative Tepro Makine.

“It is an ambitious and exhibiting exhibition schedule for 2018,” explained Dave.  “With the Master Magnets product range we are now able to offer total metal separation solutions.  Attending leading industry exhibitions is vital to understand the needs of the industry and demonstrate how we can help.”

For further information on any of the listed exhibitions or any aspect of Metal Separation or Detection, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

 

 

 

 

Is Plastic the Recycling Pantomime Villain?

Pressure Grows on Plastics and the Environment

In 2017 the media has gradually increased the pressure on the plastics industry by highlighting the effect of waste plastic in our global environment.  This focus shows no sign of going away, with the UN oceans chief stating that Ocean plastic is a ‘planetary crisis’.  

plastic-trash-in-oceans-and-waterways

Ironically, in many cases plastics are primarily used because they reduce weight and thus save energy and our natural resources.  Plastic packaging also significantly reduces food waste by keeping it fresh and is used when transporting food around the globe.

The world’s first fully synthetic plastic dates back to 1907 when the material bakelite was invented in New York by Leo Baekeland.  He also coined the term ‘plastics’.  Since then plastic has become one of the most versatile and used materials on the planet.

So why have we fallen out of love with plastic?

In July, we reported that academics were predicting that there would be 12 million metric tonnes of plastic being in landfill or the natural environment by 2050.  The recent David Attenborough nature series Blue Planet II shown on BBC1 has shown how waste plastic is found in our oceans, even reaching the depths of the Mariana Trench.

However, as highlighted by the British Plastics Federation at the UK’s waste and recycling show RWM (held in Birmingham, UK September 2017), the ‘plastic waste’ problem is complicated.

bunting_metal_separation_module_recapture_plastics-7611The fundamental global problem is that 2 million people do not have access to solid waste collection (United Nations).  The properties of plastic that make it so useful in our everyday lives also makes it difficult to breakdown and easy to get blown and transported away from the rubbish dump and into the local environment.  Gradually, this plastic waste will migrate down to the sea.

The larger problem is the origin of plastic waste.  In the developed world of the USA and Europe, investment in research and technology means that those countries only contribute approximately 2% of the plastic found in oceans.  82% is estimated to originate in Asia (The British Plastics Federation).

The problem is not just a ‘plastic waste’ issue but a ‘waste’ issue in general.  Plastic is not the only product being thrown away and ending up in our oceans.  Industrial waste is a huge problem, but is presently not the focus of attention.  In many developing countries dealing with waste is simply not their most important problem to address.  Malnutrition, housing, transport, jobs are all higher on the list of priorities.

Plastic has become waste’s ‘pantomime villain’.

This global problem needs a global solution.  There is no doubt that the designers of plastic products have a huge responsibility and need to consider the consequences of ideas such as introducing plastic microbeads into cosmetic products.

Bunting BPI-6151In the UK, we presently recycle 29% of our plastic and our target for 2020 is 57%.  The figure is so low due to the complexity of the process and economics.  Magnetic Separators, Eddy Current Separators and Metal Detectors remove metal and there is other technology to sort by colour and plastic type.  However, producing a useful plastic from waste that can be introduced as a raw material into primary plastic production (such as happens with aluminium and steel) is presently exceptionally difficult.  Until that happens, plastic waste will continue to pose a problem.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other articles on Plastics Recycling include:

Environmental Issues Highlighted at Interplas 2017

Interplas Exhibition Well Supported by Plastics Industry 

On the morning of day 2 of the Interplas 2017 exhibition (26th – 28th September, NEC, Birmingham, UK), BBC Radio 5 Live featured a news item reporting that UK pub operator, JD Weatherspoon, had decided to stop using plastic straws.  This announcement highlighted the challenges facing the plastics sector.

Bunting Magnetics Europe at Interplas 2017

Interplas 2017 is the UK’s premier show for the plastics sector and proved to be a great success.  As experienced at many UK trade exhibitions, the footfall was not as seen at shows in the USA, Germany or other European countries, but the visitors to the Bunting stand had specific metal contamination issues in their plastics production process that needed a solution.

However, plastics and their environmental impact continue to hit the headlines.  Indeed, there were two large posters on the stand of the British Plastics Federation asking:

“As we supply equipment both to companies manufacturing primary plastic products and recycling plastics, we see the problem from both sides,” said Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales.Bunting Magnetics Europe at Interplas 2017

“Even when manufacturing primary plastics, it has been common and good practice for companies to recycle and reuse their plastic waste for many years.  Indeed, this often necessitates the need for Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors, removing any rogue metal introduced during this recycling process.”

“However, the real challenge is collecting, processing and then producing a usable plastic product from recovered secondary plastic materials.  Again, we have installed Metal Separation Systems to remove ferrous and non-ferrous metals (eg at Recapture Plastics), but there remain challenges with the end market for the final recycling-sourced plastic product.”

There appears to be a growing appetite for focusing on the issue of plastics in the environment.  The implementation of charges for plastic bags by firstly the Welsh, and then the UK governments may be the first of many initiatives to reduce the use of plastic products.  The latest announcement by JD Weatherspoon about banning plastic straws is expected to be followed by similar announcements by other major coffee shops and food outlets.

At Interplas 2017, the vast majority of the exhibitors were focused on primary plastic production.  With the ever-increasing global focus on environmental issues, we wonder how different the exhibitor and visitor make-up will be at Interplas 2020.

For further information on Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors for removing metal during the primary plastic production process or in a recycling operation, please contact us on:

 

Getting Metal Out of Plastic on the Bunting Stand at Interplas 2017

Bunting Magnetics Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors at UK Plastics Show

The latest Magnetic Separation and Metal Detection technology will be on display on the Bunting Magnetics Europe stand (Hall 4, Stand H11) at Interplas 2017 (NEC, Birmingham, UK, 26th – 28th September 2017).

Bunting FFS Magnet-0064A
Bunting FF Drawer Grate Magnet

Bunting Magnetics is one of the world’s leading suppliers of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors.  The European manufacturing headquarters are based in Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire, UK and they have an extensive overseas network of distributors and marketing agents.  In January 2017, the company acquired Master Magnets, significantly expanding their range of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors.

“Interplas is the number one exhibition for the plastics sector in the UK,” said Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales, “and the show gives us a great opportunity to meet many existing and potentially new customers.”

Bunting Magnetics has a strong global relationship with the plastics sector.  Many of their Magnetic Separators have been designed specifically for use in the manufacture and recycling of plastics and plastic products.

The Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors on the Bunting stand at Interplas are designed to capture, identify and remove metal contamination.  The presence of rogue metal damages processing equipment and affects the end-product quality and reject rates.

Bunting BPI-6151

The FF Drawer Grate Magnet is specifically designed for removing magnetically-susceptible particles from plastic.  The standard model has 2 banks of Neodymium Rare Earth Tube Magnets mounted inside a sealed housing.  Other variations are available including a low profile design for positioning underneath large hoppers and silos. Magnetic Separators with Neodymium Rare Earth Magnets remove even the smallest magnetically-susceptible particles.  On the stand will be examples of extremely strong Magnetic Grates, Plate Magnets, Tube Magnets, and the industry-standard FF Drawer Grate Magnet.  Visitors will be invited to test the magnetic strength for themselves.

Bunting Magnetics Europe at RWM16“This combination [FF Drawer Grate Magnet and the quickTRON Metal Detector] offers the best method of removing metal from free-falling materials,” explained Dave Hills.  “The Magnetic Separator captures and holds any magnetically attracted metals such as steel screws, bolts, steel slithers from worn equipment, and even work-hardened stainless steel.  This always proves to be the bulk of the metal contamination.For a complete metal separation solution, the FF Drawer Grate Magnet is fitted above a quickTRON Metal Detector.  The Metal Detector then identifies and rejects any non-ferrous metals.

“Any remaining metal will be identified as it passes through the Metal Detector and then ejected.  The cleansed plastic can then proceed safety into the next stage of the process, whether than is to the extruder or granulator.”

A working, production-sized model of the combined FF Drawer Grate Magnet and quickTRON Metal Detector will be on the Bunting stand at Interplas.  Regular demonstrations will enable visitors to witness the capabilities of the complete metal separation system.

p-TRON-GM-V2
pTRON Metal Detector

A range of pTRON Metal Detectors designed for use in Pneumatic transportation lines will also be on display on the Bunting stand.

With the acquisition of Master Magnets, Bunting also has an extensive range of Magnetic Separators and Eddy Current Separators for the recycling sector.

“The combined experience of Bunting and Master Magnets means that we have a solution for most metal separation problems.  The Master Magnets Eddy Current Separator is an industry standard and is used to remove non-ferrous metals from plastics in recycling operations across the world,” said Dave Hills.

For further information on the Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors that will be on show at the Interplas 2017 exhibition, please contact us on:

Plastics and the Environment

The Necessity of a Global Strategy for Plastics Waste

Since 1950, it is estimated that 8.3 million metric tonnes of virgin plastics have been produced.  Of this, 6.3 million metric tonnes has become waste, with 9% being recycled and 12% incinerated.  This leaves 79% that is accumulated in landfills or the natural environment.

The report written by Geyer, Jambeck and Kara Lavender Law is concerning with a prediction of 12 million metric tonnes of plastic being in landfill or the natural environment by 2050.

Hanbury Plastics Bunting Overband Magnet-7975In the UK, organisations such as The British Plastics Federation (BPF) identify sustainability as being key to the future growth of the plastics sector.  They report that the UK uses over 5 million tonnes of plastic each year of which an estimated 29% is currently being recovered or recycled.  The UK has a plastics recycling target of 57% by 2020 and the BPF and Plastics Europe with the support of WRAP are implementing the Plastics Industry Recycing Action Plan (PIRAP) to help meet this target.  However, increasing the amount of plastic being recovered or recycled by 28% in 3 years appears to be exceptionally challenging and maybe unreachable.

The application of plastics technology continues to grow, with the UK launching a new plastic £10 note in September 2017.  And this is because plastics technology produces such versatile and resilient products, properties that make it equally difficult to manage once it has been used and becomes waste.

Designing plastic products to enable easy reuse and recycling appears to be the key.  However, often the aesthetic appearance of a plastic packaging product takes precedence over the post-use waste functionality.

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As an equipment supplier, we understand the difficulties of recycling plastics.  Even though we can remove the metal contamination with Magnetic Separators, Eddy Current Separators, and Metal Detectors, a substantial amount of further processing is required with colour and plastic type separation is often required.  We will be exhibiting at Interplas 2017 (NEC, Birmingam, UK 26th – 28th September), the UK’s premier show for the plastics sector, and it will be interesting to see and hear the ideas and thoughts of the industry.

Designers of plastic products, especially packaging, need to be creative and give reuse and recycling a higher priority during the concept phase.  With the prediction of an ever-increasing production of plastic, a workable environmental strategy has never been more important.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other articles on Plastics Recycling include: