Plastics and the Environment

The Necessity of a Global Strategy for Plastics Waste

Since 1950, it is estimated that 8.3 million metric tonnes of virgin plastics have been produced.  Of this, 6.3 million metric tonnes has become waste, with 9% being recycled and 12% incinerated.  This leaves 79% that is accumulated in landfills or the natural environment.

The report written by Geyer, Jambeck and Kara Lavender Law is concerning with a prediction of 12 million metric tonnes of plastic being in landfill or the natural environment by 2050.

Hanbury Plastics Bunting Overband Magnet-7975In the UK, organisations such as The British Plastics Federation (BPF) identify sustainability as being key to the future growth of the plastics sector.  They report that the UK uses over 5 million tonnes of plastic each year of which an estimated 29% is currently being recovered or recycled.  The UK has a plastics recycling target of 57% by 2020 and the BPF and Plastics Europe with the support of WRAP are implementing the Plastics Industry Recycing Action Plan (PIRAP) to help meet this target.  However, increasing the amount of plastic being recovered or recycled by 28% in 3 years appears to be exceptionally challenging and maybe unreachable.

The application of plastics technology continues to grow, with the UK launching a new plastic £10 note in September 2017.  And this is because plastics technology produces such versatile and resilient products, properties that make it equally difficult to manage once it has been used and becomes waste.

Designing plastic products to enable easy reuse and recycling appears to be the key.  However, often the aesthetic appearance of a plastic packaging product takes precedence over the post-use waste functionality.

Bunting_Metal_Separation_Module_Recapture_Plastics-7590

As an equipment supplier, we understand the difficulties of recycling plastics.  Even though we can remove the metal contamination with Magnetic Separators, Eddy Current Separators, and Metal Detectors, a substantial amount of further processing is required with colour and plastic type separation is often required.  We will be exhibiting at Interplas 2017 (NEC, Birmingam, UK 26th – 28th September), the UK’s premier show for the plastics sector, and it will be interesting to see and hear the ideas and thoughts of the industry.

Designers of plastic products, especially packaging, need to be creative and give reuse and recycling a higher priority during the concept phase.  With the prediction of an ever-increasing production of plastic, a workable environmental strategy has never been more important.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other articles on Plastics Recycling include:

Temperature Effect on Rare Earth Magnetic Separators

Neodymium Magnet Damage From High Temperatures

If a Neodymium Rare Earth Tube Magnet is put into a red-hot fire, then it would not be surprising if the magnetic properties are destroyed.  However, what if the same Tube Magnet is just exposed to steam being flushed through a pipeline system to clean the pipes?

Tube Magnets manufactured with high quality Neodymium Magnets are able to operate well in temperatures up to 100 degrees C.  There is a gradual drop in magnetic strength when the temperature rises above 80 degrees C, but this loss in magnetic strength recovers when the temperature falls back to normal levels.

However, as soon as the Neodymium Rare Earth Tube Magnets are exposed to temperatures exceeding 100 degrees C, the magnetic strength becomes compromised.  On returning to normal operating temperatures below 80 degrees C, there is an irreversible loss in magnetic strength and permanent damage.

Bunting Magnetic Liquid TrapIn a pipeline which is cleaned using steam, the temperature will be above 100 degrees C for a period of time.  This will certainly damage any standard Neodymium Rare Earth Tube Magnets or Magnetic Separators (e.g. the Magnetic Liquid Filter) installed in the pipeline.  However, most users are totally unaware of the potential loss in magnetic separation performance and that the ability of the Magnetic Separator to remove small pieces of metal contamination has been permanently compromised.

Magnetic Separators in High Temperature Environments

There are types of Neodymium Rare Earth Magnets that are designed to operate in high temperature environments.  These tend to be lower in magnetic strength at room temperature, but the magnetic field does not degrade as quickly as standard Neodymium Magnets at higher temperatures.  Also, on returning to normal temperatures, there is only a small irreversible loss in magnetic field, which is only experienced when first exposed to high temperatures.

This type of high temperature Neodymium Rare Earth Magnet should be used in pipelines which are being cleaned for prolonged periods with steam.

Tube_Magnet_FireFor applications where there are extreme high temperatures (exceeding 150 degrees C), then the best option is to use Samarium Cobalt Rare Earth Magnets (SmCo).  These retain their magnetic properties in temperatures up to 300 degrees C.  However, such applications are rare.

It is recommended that the magnetic properties and strength of any Magnetic Separator installed in a pipeline cleaned with steam or in an environment where there is constant exposure to high temperatures is checked on a regular basis (e.g. during an annual Magnetic Separation Audit).  The best way to do this is with a Magnetic Pull Test Kit.

For further details on Magnetic Separators designed for high temperature applications, please contact our technical sales team on:

10 Magnetic Separator Myths

Magnetic Separator Fact and Fiction

Trying to ascertain what and whose Magnetic Separator will provide the best metal separation can be difficult.  Often, the decision is made even more difficult with claims and counterclaims about levels of Gauss and what the Magnetic Separator can actually capture.  In this blog, we try to dispel these myths and make selecting the right Magnetic Separator a little easier.

Myth 1 – You Should Always Use the Strongest Magnetic Separator

Strongest is always best, or is it?  Commonly, companies will call and request a quote for a Magnetic Separator with the strongest magnet.  But is that actually what they need?

magnetic-pull-test-kit-bunting-magnetics-blog

Myth 2 – All Rare Earth Magnetic Separators Are The Same

A client has a metal contamination problem and needs to install the most suitable magnetic separation.  The metal is small and so they believe that a Magnetic Separator with Rare Earth Neodymium Magnets is what they need as this produces the strongest magnetic field.  So he picks up the phone and orders a Rare Earth Magnetic Separator and his problem is solved.  Or is it?

Myth 3 – The Highest Gauss Magnetic Separator Is Always The Best, Or Is It?

On a regular basis, we will receive an enquiry requesting a Magnetic Separator of a specific size.  However, it is only when the enquiry also requests a specific Gauss figure that it all starts becoming a little complicated.

Myth 4 – Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, Or Is It?

The vast majority of stainless steel used in plants processing foodstuffs, chemicals, plastics and handling bulk materials whether in solid, liquid or powder form, is non-magnetic.  Or is it?bunting-ffs-magnet-with-stainless-steel-washer-and-wingnut-0086

 

Myth 5 – Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?

It is a question we frequently get asked:  When will the Magnetic Separator start losing its magnetic strength?  In normal operating conditions, a magnetic separator will not lose any magnetic strength.  However, there are occasions when other factors do affect the magnetic strength.

Myth 6 – Is A Magnetic Field Uniform Along the Surface of a Tube Magnet?

On a typical Cartridge or Tube Magnet, the magnetic field on the surface is not even along the whole length.  As shown on the photograph, magnetically attracted materials agglomerate at specific points along the length.  So why is that?

Myth 7 – We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation

In the perfect world, installing a Magnetic Separator will enable 100% metal separation with 0% product loss.  However, is this even remotely possible?

Myth 8 – You Can Block a Magnetic Field

A common question asked by users of Magnets and Magnetic Separators is whether a Magnetic Field can be blocked in the same way that lead blocks radiation.  This can be an important issue when considering the location of a Magnetic Separator and whether it is near instrumentation, control panels, or is in an area freely accessible by employees.

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Myth 9 – Magnetic Separators Are Not Dangerous?!??

In school science, we learn about magnetism by playing with small permanent magnets.  It is fun, seeing how iron filings are affected by the magnetic field.  Our bodies are also constantly exposed to the Earth’s Magnetic Field.

So how can Magnets be dangerous?

Myth 10 – It Is Easy To Clean a Magnetic Separator

The Magnetic Separator has done its job and captured that potentially damaging item of ferrous metal.  Now it is time to remove the captured metal from the surface of the Magnetic Separator.  It should be easy, shouldn’t it?  However, due to the high magnetic power cleaning metal off a Magnetic Separator is becoming increasing difficult and a health and safety concern.

For further details on Magnetic Separator Myths or to discuss any Metal Contamination and Separation issue, please contact our technical sales team on:

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Magnetic Separators Are Not Dangerous!??

9th of 10 Magnetic Separation Myths

In school science, we learn about magnetism by playing with small permanent magnets.  It is fun, seeing how iron filings are affected by the magnetic field.  Our bodies are also constantly exposed to the Earth’s Magnetic Field.

So how can Magnets be dangerous?

In the 1980s, the concept of permanent magnetism changed with the development of the ‘Rare Earth Magnet‘.  The new permanent magnets produced a Magnetic Field and Force far higher than traditional Ferrite or Ceramic Magnets.

Since the 1980s, the magnetic strength of Rare Earth Magnets, like the Neodymium Iron Boron type, has increased.  Tube or Cartridge Magnets (as used in Magnetic Separators like Grate Magnets and Drawer Magnets) commonly use Rare Earth Magnets.  The high permanent magnetic force enables the attraction and capture of very fine or weakly magnetic materials.  This is vitally important when processing and producing plastics, foodstuffs or pharmaceuticals.

Bunting Magnetics Europe Ltd FFS Magnet-0095

But are they dangerous?

A strong Tube or Cartridge ‘Rare Earth’ Magnet has a surface magnetic reading of around 12,000 gauss.  The ‘Ferrite’ type has a surface field of 1,500 gauss.  In terms of magnetic force, the difference is enormous.

However, the real test comes when using a spring balance to pull a small steel ball bearing off the surface of the Tube Magnet.  When the steel ball is pulled off the Ferrite Tube Magnet, the force needed is negligible.  On testing the Rare Earth Tube Magnet, over 2kg of force is required.

Now we know that magnets attract.  So if two Rare Earth Tube Magnets are placed near each other, they will naturally want to go together.  The speed of the two items moving towards each other increases until they meet and the resultant collision is substantial.  If a hand or finger is in between the two Tube Magnets, the force of the attraction could result in serious injury.  People have been known to break or badly bruise fingers just by having them caught between two attracting Rare Earth Magnets.

So, the answer is a loud yes.  Magnets can be dangerous.  Luckily, advice and guidance is provided when advising users about Magnetic Separators.  And many Magnetic Separator designs include excellent safety features.

For further information on Rare Earth Magnets, Magnetic Separators, and Safety Advice, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?
  7. We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation
  8. You Can Block a Magnetic Field

You Can Block a Magnetic Field

8th of 10 Magnetic Separation Myths

A common question asked by users of Magnets and Magnetic Separators is whether a Magnetic Field can be blocked in the same way that lead blocks radiation.  This can be an important issue when considering the location of a Magnetic Separator and whether it is near instrumentation, control panels, or is in an area freely accessible by employees.

The simple answer is that it is not possible to totally ‘block’ a magnetic field.  The essence of a magnet, as determined by nature, is that magnetic field lines must terminate on the opposite pole and, therefore, there is no way to stop them.

tube-cartridge-magnets-bunting-magnetics-4

However, often it is necessary to protect equipment from magnetic fields and this is achieved by re-routing the magnetic field.  This is otherwise known as ‘Magnetic Shielding’ and is achieved by casing the equipment requiring protection inside a structure that is made from or comprises of a material that has a very high magnetic permeability such as steel.  The magnetic field then flows along such that material, channeling the lines of magnetic field away from the components that require protecting, such as delicate electronics.

Not being able to completely block a Magnetic Field also causes difficulties for transporting Magnetic Separators and Magnetic Assemblies.  Many overseas customers ask if a particular Magnetic Separator can be transported by air.  Due to the inherent safety risk, there are strict regulations on how magnetically charged equipment and components can be transported due to concerns about interference with aircraft instrumentation.  Although such interference is extremely unlikely (due to most magnets having very shallow fields that do not even extend out of their packaging) there are guidelines that state:

  • Where possible the magnets are positioned with the north pole next to another’s south pole;
  • Thin sheets of steel are packed around the magnets in order to shunt the magnetic field and restrict it from penetrating outside of the box.  .

These guidelines are often possible to follow for small Magnets and Magnetic Separators, however transporting larger Magnetic Separators can very difficult and, if possible at all, exceptionally expensive.bunting-vulcanis-1139-2

This technique of channeling magnetic fields is actually used when designing Magnetic Separators such as the Overband Cross Belt Magnet, where magnetised blocks inside a stainless steel case have a thick steel backbar welded on one side to force the magnetic field to project away and in one direction.  This is a positive way of channeling the magnetic field to achieve the specific objective of picking up steel and magnetically susceptible materials.

For further information on Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Separators, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

  1. Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?
  2. All Rare Earth Magnets are not the Same;
  3. The Highest Gauss Magnet is not always the Best;
  4. Stainless Steel Isn’t Magnetic, or is it?;
  5. Do Magnets Lose Strength Over Time?
  6. Is a Magnetic Field Uniform Across the Surface of a Tube Magnet?
  7. We Guarantee 100% Metal Separation

Is a Magnetic Field Uniform along the Surface of a Tube Magnet?

6th of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

On a typical Cartridge or Tube Magnet, the magnetic field on the surface is not even along the whole length.  As shown on the photograph, magnetically attracted materials agglomerate at specific points along the length.  So why is that?

metal-contamination-on-magnets

A Cartridge or Tube Magnetic Separator is constructed by placing an alternating series of magnet slugs and steel discs inside a stainless steel tube.  Each magnet slug has a North and South pole and is inserted into the tube so that the South Pole faces another South pole and visa-versa.  When the magnet slugs are very strong, as in the case of the Bunting Cartridge Magnetic Separators which use high strength Neodymium Iron Boron or Rare Earth Magnets, the assembly requires a great deal of skill and knowledge.  In between each magnet slug is a steel disc which acts as a magnetic pole, intensifying the magnetic field.  As shown on the photograph below, the magnetic field is drawn into each steel pole positioned between each magnet slug, with magnetic field lines arcing from the North to the South Pole.

magnetics-on-a-tube-magnet

Any magnetically susceptible particle moving into the lines of magnetic field will be attracted to the point of highest intensity, which is at the nearest pole.  Hence why magnetically captured particles are then seen to agglomerate at specific points along the surface of a Cartridge or Tube Magnetic Separators.  They have been held at the point of the highest magnetic field, which is between the magnet slugs and actually on the steel pole piece.

Hence why a magnetic field is not uniform along the surface of a Magnetic Separator like the Tube Magnet.

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series of blogs include:

When assessing the right Magnetic Separator for an application, please speak with one of our trained sales engineers who can assess your requirements and recommend the Magnetic Separator that is right for you.

For more information please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Magnetic Myths reviewed in this series include:

bunting-cartridge-tube-magnetic-separators-4

The Highest Gauss Magnetic Separator is the Not Always the Strongest!

3rd of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

On a regular basis, we will receive an enquiry requesting a Magnetic Separator of a specific size.  However, it is only when the enquiry also requests a specific gauss figure that it all starts becoming a little complicated.

Frequently, the gauss figure has been added with little understanding of the meaning of ‘gauss’.  It is a figure commonly quoted by companies supplying magnetic separators, but what is the relevance?  Is 100,000 gauss better than 10 gauss?

Gauss’ is the cgs (centimeter-gram-second) unit of measurement of a magnetic field, which is also known as the ‘magnetic flux induction’ or the ‘magnetic induction’.  One gauss is equal to one Maxwell per square centimeter.

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But does that really help or simply add to the confusion?  And does it help a purchaser understand if one Magnetic Separator is stronger than another?

There are several inherent problems with basing a magnetic separator purchasing decision on the ‘gauss’ value alone.  These include:

  1. How do you know that the Magnetic Separator you are purchasing actually has the quoted level of gauss?
  2. Even if you have a gauss meter to measure the gauss, have you been trained how to correctly use it?
  3. Where on the Magnetic Separator is that highest gauss reading, as different levels of gauss will be found at various points on the Magnetic Separator?
  4. The ability of the Magnetic Separator to capture metal particles is not only a function of gauss alone and, in many cases, higher gauss Magnetic Separators will not provide the best metal separation;

In fact, if the word ‘gauss’ is swapped for ‘elephants’ they may be equally relevant.  This is only because a value is meaningless unless it is quantifiable.  A request for a Cartridge or Tube Magnet with 11,000 gauss on the surface could be perceived as having the same meaning as asking for one stated as having the strength of 11,000 elephants. This is only because the ‘gauss’ figure is exceptionally difficult or impossible for a customer to actually measure.

However, help is at hand!  There is a simple way to assess and measure the magnetic attractive force on a Magnetic Separator.  Undertaking a physical test at least partly removes the ‘gauss’ reading from the assessment.  The process is simple:

  • Use a Spring Balance with a 3mm steel ball on the end;
  • The Steel Ball is placed on the surface of the Magnetic Separator;
  • The Steel Ball is then pulled away and off the Magnetic Separator;
  • A reading is taken on the Spring Balance (in kilogrammes).  This is the break away force;
  • The test is repeated at several locations on the Magnetic Separator;

Magnetic Pull Test Kit Bunting MagneticsBy conducting this test, you know have a real tangible figure than means something.  You can conduct the same test on other Magnetic Separators and then you will be able to confirm which Magnetic Separator requires the highest kg force to extract the Steel Ball from the Magnetic Field.

As part of the internal auditing system, the Magnetic Separator test can be repeated at regular intervals to ensure that the Magnetic Separator is not losing strength.  It is a simple and very effective method of assessing the magnetic strength of smaller Magnetic Separators and doesn’t need extensive training using costly and high tech equipment.

So, when requesting a price for a Magnetic Separator, it is recommended that you ask for the number of kilogrammes needed to pull the 3mm steel ball from the surface and, when you receive the equipment, test it to check that what you have purchased is what was ordered.

Interestingly, many of our customers have found that some Cartridge or Tube Magnets with high quoted ‘gauss’ figures actually need less kilogrammes of force to remove the steel ball from the surface of the Magnetic Separator.  In reality, this means that they are magnetically weaker than those with lower gauss figures.  Now, isn’t that rather odd?

Magnetic Separator Myth 1 – Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?

Magnetic Separator Myth 2 – Are all Rare Earth Magnetic Separators the Same?

For more information or a site review by our trained sales engineers, please contact us on:

Phone:  01442 875081

Email: sales@buntingeurope.com

Via our website

Are all Rare Earth Magnetic Separators the Same?

2nd of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

A client has a metal contamination problem and needs to install the most suitable magnetic separation.  The metal is small and so they believe that a Magnetic Separator with Rare Earth Magnets is what they need as this produces the strongest magnetic field.  So he picks up the phone and orders a Rare Earth Magnetic Separator and his problem is solved.

Or is it?

Bunting Europe at PRE 2015-2520

Unfortunately, the term ‘Rare Earth Magnet’ is pretty unspecific.  It’s the same as ordering a car instead of specifying a specific model like a Ford Mondeo or BMW 5 series.  This blog will help explain.

Rare Earth Magnets are strong permanent magnets made from alloys of rare earth elements such as Neodymium Iron Boron. Developed in the 1970s and ’80s, Rare Earth Magnets are the strongest type of permanent magnets made, producing significantly stronger magnetic fields than other types such as ferrite or alnico magnets.  The magnetic field typically produced by rare-earth magnets can be in excess of 1.4 Tesla, whereas ferrite or ceramic magnets typically exhibit fields of 0.5 to 1 tesla. There are two types of Rare Earth Magnet:

The use of the different types of Rare Earth Magnets depends on the application and the following is a general guide:

  1. Neodynium Iron Boron (Nd2Fe14B) – Unfortunately, life is never that straight forward and there are two distinct types of Neodymium Magnet:
    • Sintered – These are produced using a high temperature process to produce a strong even and uniform bond of the material. This is the highest grade of Neodynium Iron Boron Rare Earth Magnet, producing surface fields of between 1 and 1.4 Tesla.  Due to the higher specification, these are higher in cost;
    • Bonded – These are weaker in terms of their magnetic properties. The materials are mixed and bonded using a synthetic resin or polymer.  However, due to the manufacturing process the magnetic strength is lower (0.6 to 0.7 Tesla) and they are physically weaker.  Bonded Neodynium Iron Boron is cheaper than sintered versions;
  2. Samarium Cobalt (SmCo5) – All Samarium Cobalt magnets are sintered and the magnetic fields produced range from 0.8 to 1.15 Tesla.  However, these magnets are significantly more expensive than Neodymium Iron Boron, but they are ideal for very high temperature applications.  Whereas standard Neodynium Iron Boron magnets are suitable for applications up to 80° C, Samarium Cobalt and high temperature Neodynmium Iron Boron magnets maintain their magnetic strength at higher temperatures;

In industry, the most common Rare Earth Magnets are Neodynium Iron Boron, but it is worth asking whether the magnets inside the Cartridge or Tube Magnet or Plate Magnet are sintered or bonded.  The vast majority of magnetic separators use the sintered Rare Earth Material as it is physically better and produces a higher magnetic field, but we recommend asking the question to ensure that what is supplied is true value for money and best suited for the application.

Other Magnetic Myths in this series published so far are:

Should you always use the strongest Magnet?

For more information or a site review by our trained sales engineers, please contact us on:

Phone: 01442875081

Email: sales@buntingeurope.com

Via the website

What is an Axial and Radial Magnetic Field?

Explaining Magnetic Separation

Rotary Magnetic Separators, such as the Bunting Drum Magnet and Magnetic Separation Pulley, are designed with a specific type of magnetic field.  The type of magnetic field has to be considered when looking at any application and when deciding which design will achieve a customer’s separation objective.

So what is an Axial or Radial Magnetic Field and why is it so important?

Axial Magnetic Field

Axial Magnetic Field Bunting Magnetics- Figure 1 – Axial Magnetic Field

This is when the magnetic field stretches across the width of the rotary Magnetic Separator.  Magnetically susceptible material entering into the field is attracted to the point of highest magnetic intensity (the pole) but is then dragged through an area of weaker field (between the poles) and onto another pole by the motion of the conveyor or drum.

This type of magnetic field is ideal when there could be a high level of entrapped non-magnetic material captured by the Magnetic Separator.  The motion of moving between the poles results in non-magnetic material being released as the magnetic item ‘tumbles’ in the field.  However, with this type of magnetic field there can be a reduced separation performance.

Radial Magnetic Field

Radial Magnetic Field Bunting MagneticsFigure 2 – Radial Magnetic Field

The Radial Magnetic Field has poles running in the same direction as the rotation of the conveyor or drum and with the flow of the material.  Magnetically susceptible material is attracted to the points of highest magnetic intensity (the poles) and held until it is dragged out of the magnetic field underneath the conveyor or Drum.

This type of magnetic field is ideal when the maximum level of separation is required, but there can be some carryover of non-magnetic material.  The fact that the captured magnetics always remain on the pole of highest magnetic intensity means that they are far more likely to be removed and, therefore, the radial design provides the best level of separation.

These types of Magnetic Fields are used in Magnetic Separators such as Magnetic Drums and Magnetic Pulleys.

For further details on the Bunting range of Metal Separation Equipment, please contact our technical sales team on:

 

Should You Always Use the Strongest Magnet?

 1st of 10 Magnetic Separator Myths

Strongest is always best, or is it?  Commonly, companies will call and request a quote for a Magnetic Separator with the strongest magnet.  But is that actually what they need?

Magnetic Pull Test Kit Bunting Magnetics

The strongest magnetic fields are produced by specialist Superconducting Magnets and are used in industrial and medical applications.  However, their use in industry is very specific due to the high capital cost and you would not find a Superconducting Magnet installed in a food processing line removing nuts and bolt.  So, immediately the term ‘strongest’ has lost some relevance.

Also, the wide range and varied designs of Magnetic Separator means that comparing one with another on the basis of magnetic strength alone is impossible.  If they are the same type of magnetic separator (e.g. a Cartridge or Tube Magnet), then you have a chance, but even then strongest magnet is not necessarily the best solution for the specific metal separation issue.

Before quoting for any magnetic separator, it is vitally important for us to understand the application and there are a number of key questions that we ask.  They include:

  1. What is the metal that needs be magnetically separated? How big?  How magnetic?
  2. From what is the metal to be magnetically separated?
  3. Why does the metal need to be removed? Is it to protect some down-line processing equipment?  Is it to recover the metal?
  4. How is the material being transported? Is it on a conveyor or as a slurry in a pipeline?
  5. What is the budget?

Armed with this information, the application can then be assessed by experienced engineers and a suitable design and strength of magnetic separation will be proposed.

However, do not be surprised if it isn’t the strongest magnet.

For more information or a site review by our trained sales engineers, please contact us on:

Call us on 01442875081

Email: sales@buntingeurope.com

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