Bunting Return to ArabPlast Exhibition

Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors at ArabPlast 2019

After a successful exhibition in 2017, Bunting Magnetics is, once again, exhibiting at the ArabPlast international exhibition (5-8 January 2019, Dubai World Trade Centre, Dubai, UAE).  On stand 5D125, Bunting is exhibiting magnetic separators and metal detectors specifically designed for use in the plastics industry.

Exhibiting in 2017 was a great success,” explained Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales.  “We had the opportunity to speak with many new potential customers.  We even secured an order for a FF Drawer Filter Magnet and quickTRON Metal Detector on the stand at the show!”

bunting_europe_arabplast_dubai-1335
Simon Ayling and Dave Hills on the stand at ArabPlast 2017

ArabPlast is the largest trade expo for plastics, petrochemicals and rubber industry in the MENA region.  The 2017 exhibition had 906 exhibitors from 41 countries and 27,268 visitors from 119 countries.

On the stand at ArabPlast, Bunting will be displaying a wide range of equipment used to remove metal contamination from the plastics manufacturing process including:

At ArabPlast, the Bunting team intends to help local plastics companies solve any metal contamination problems.  The team is able to draw upon their vast experience in Europe and the USA.

Bunting Europe at Technivation
FF Drawer Filter Magnet

The Bunting team is also looking forward to helping local recycling companies address plastic waste management.  They intend to share experience of working with UK plastic recyclers such as EcoVyn where the installation of FF Drawer Grate Filters reduced waste by 94%.

“Exhibiting at overseas exhibitions is an important part of our marketing strategy,” said Dave.  “It gives us the opportunity to meet local companies and learn about their market.  We can also share our experiences, helping companies solve metal contamination problems, reducing waste and increasing efficiency.  The Middle East and North Africa market is evolving at a rapid pace and offers great opportunities.”

For further information about metal separation equipment designed for removing metal during the plastic or plastic product manufacturing process, please visit us at ArabPlast, go to our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

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The Changing Face of Plastics Recycling

The Big Story Headline Article in British Plastics & Rubber (Nov/Dec 18 Issue)

The BBC’s Blue Planet II appeared on our television screen in September 2017.  The amazing documentary series highlighted the challenges faced by marine life and generated a global anti-plastic tidal wave that shows no sign of diminishing.  However, has anything actually changed?

Since September 2017, there has been a swathe of political rhetoric culminating in the UK’s Autumn 2018 budget announcements.  Chancellor Philip Hammond outlined several new measures to tackle plastic waste.  This included introducing a new tax from 1 April 2022 on produced or imported plastic packaging that does not include at least a 30 per cent recycled content.

Bunting_Metal_Separation_Module_Recapture_Plastics-7586
Baled cleaned plastic waste

The European parliament is also taking action against plastic waste.  Under the parliament-backed directive, items such as plastic straws, cotton swabs, disposable plastic plates and cutlery would be banned by 2021.  Additionally, 90% of all plastic bottles would be recycled by 2025.

However, the fundamental difficulties in collecting, separating and re-using plastic remain.  In the UK, each council adopts their own recycling strategy.  Households in different regions are told to separate and collect different materials.  Swindon council has taken one step further and is considering burning plastic along with other rubbish rather than sending the material abroad for recycling.  Other councils, such as Basingstoke, has instructed residents to only recycle certain types of plastic.  Despite the Chancellor committing £20 million to tackle plastics and boost recycling, there is no unified country-wide strategy.

bunting_metal_separation_module_recapture_plastics-7611
Baled plastic waste

The successful recycling of any material requires good planning and execution.  Ironically, this must start at the end of the process.  Firstly waste plastic must be clearly categorised into material than is recyclable and unrecyclable, possibly using the global definition proposed by Plastics Recycling Europe and The Association of Plastic Recyclers.  This ensures that recovered plastic waste can be re-used.  Recovering, transporting and then discarding materials than are unrecyclable is costly in terms of effort, money and energy.

Ongoing research and changes in product design, will identify new techniques to broaden the scope of recyclable plastic waste.  The criteria for plastic waste collection will change accordingly.

Secondly. strategically located plastic waste recycling plants are needed to keep transportation to a minimum.  Each plant will receive the same mix of plastic waste, enabling continued development and improvement of the recycling process.  This stops each plant having to develop unique processes to suit the plastic waste collected in one region.

Hanbury Plastics Bunting Overband Magnet-2
Plastic Waste Recycling Plant

By having a clear country-wide recycling collection specification, contamination levels of the plastic waste will reduce.  Separation technology, such as magnetic separators and metal detectors, will still be required, but the purity levels of the end-product will increase.

Bunting Magnetics Drawer Magnets at Ecovyn
Metal contamination removed from granulated plastic waste

Politicians have only introduced these new policies due to the unprecedented reaction from the general public.  However, setting a target without any definitive plan of how to achieve that result may be considered foolish.  Equally, introducing new taxes, that may ultimately be paid by the consumer, is not addressing the key issues that prevent plastic waste from being recycled.  It is time for the politicians to sit down with the industry and agree a proper plan.

For further information about metal separation equipment designed for removing metal during the plastic or plastic product manufacturing process, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Photographs taken by Paul Fears Photography

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24 Drawer Filter Magnets Destined for France

Metal Removed From Plastics

24 Drawer Filter Magnets are under manufacture at our European HQ in Berkhamsted, UK.  The Drawer Filter Magnets are destined for installation in a plastics production operation in France.

Bunting_Drawer_Filter_Magnets-8
Drawer Filter Magnets at an early stage of manufacture

“The Drawer Filter Magnet is one of our most popular magnetic separators,” said Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales.

The order for the Drawer Filter Magnets was secured by Bunting’s local representative in France, BMS.  BMS specialise in providing technical support to the plastics sector.

Drawer Filter Magnet Specification

All 24 Drawer Filter Magnets have the same specification:

  • Model:  LP-1600-PL: Low Profile Drawer Filter Magnet
  • Magnets:  Three (3) high strength Neodymium Rare Earth Magnets;, three 25mm diameter stainless steel
  • Dimension of the opening:  150mm square
  • Height:  180mm
  • Rows of Magnets:  One
  • Flanges:  Bottom and top included, 6.35mm thick
  • Slide gate:  6.35mm thick
  • Viewing port:  Unit features a 9.5mm thick clear polycarbonate drawer front

Application

During the manufacturing process of any plastic or plastic product, it is possible for metal to be introduced into the process.  This could be from a wide variety of sources including the wear of processing machinery.

Bunting_Drawer_Filter_Magnets-0346

If metal contamination is not removed, it can damage processing equipment and result in increased final product rejects.  The Drawer Filter Magnets are used to attract, hold and thus remove any magnetically susceptible metal contamination.

Another Export Order

“This is another great export order for Bunting,”said Hills.  “Despite all the concerns about BREXIT, we continue to work hard supporting our regionally based distributors.  This is paying dividends as our sales overseas continue to rise.”

For further information about metal separation equipment designed for removing metal during the plastic or plastic product manufacturing process, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Plastics Industry Articles

 

3 Facts About Plastic Packaging Waste

Latest 2016 Waste Recycling DEFRA Data

The UK’s largest recycling exhibition, RWM, takes place on the 12th and 13th September 2018 (NEC, Birmingham, UK).  Leading up to the show, we wanted to review three key facts relating to the latest DEFRA data (from 2016) on plastic packaging waste (published in February 2018).

Waste Drinks Containers-9048

The Amount of Plastic Packaging Waste

UK households generated 1,015,000 tonnes of plastic packaging waste in 2016.  This is actually 12% lower than in 2012, although the amount has been relatively stagnant since 2103.  In 2016, 20% of all packaging waste was plastic (by weight), although this percentage would be far higher if measured by volume due to the low bulk density of the material.

A Rising Recycling Rate

45% of plastic packaging was recycled or recovered in 2016 compared with 25% in 2012.  The 2016 figure is higher than the EU target of 22.5%.  Since the beginning of 2018, the UK Government has set a new recycling and recoverable target of 57% by 2020.  This means that new strategies are needed to raise the rate by 12% in just four years.

Plastic Packaging Recycling Rates

However, there remains a question about what to do with the plastic once it has been recovered.  The UK still exports a large proportion of its waste, but this is still classed as being ‘recovered’ and is included in the 45%.  Since China closed their doors to waste, plastic waste has being shipped to countries around the world, including Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam.  This is not a sustainable solution, but it not reported in the statistics.  An increasing amount of plastic waste is expected to remain in the UK and it is unclear how it will be managed.

Plastics Recycling Plants

It is widely accepted that there are not enough plastic recycling plants in the UK.  In the past, it has been difficult to economically operate a plant with high costs associated with equipment investment and site difficulties due to the flammable nature of plastic waste.

Bunting Magnetics Drawer Magnets at Ecovyn
FF Drawer Filter Magnets (supplied by Bunting Magnetics Europe Ltd) removing metal from plastic waste to enable recycling

One successful plant is located near Wrexham in North Wales where EcoVyn process 1,000 tonnes per month of good quality plastic waste.  EcoVyn installed several Drawer Filter Magnets to remove ferrous metal contamination from the granulated plastic.

The Future

There has been a huge change in the public perception of plastic waste since the showing of the BBC series Blue Planet II in 2017.  This has forced politicians to start taking action and it will be interesting to see the level of political and governmental engagement at the RWM exhibition.

For further information on metal separation equipment designed for removing metal from plastic waste and in other recycling applications, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Plastic Waste & Recycling Articles

Defining Plastics Recyclability

Global Definition of Recyclable Plastic Packaging and Products Released

The global outcry of hostility against plastic products has been gathering momentum since the end of 2017 and, subsequently, politicians and governments have pledged to introduce measures to reduce plastic waste.   However, many of these new policies have been deemed to be popularist and lacking in substance.

plastic-bottles

Many governments, including the European Union, have set recycling targets that have been questioned by the recycling and plastics industries.  The EU has made a pledge to have all plastic packaging recyclable or reusable by 2030, a far more aggressive strategy that the UK Government’s plan for plastic waste reduction.

However, until recently, there has not been a definition to govern the use of the term “recyclable” and so how could any of those targets be quantified?  Due to the public outrage about how plastic waste is damaging our planet, politicians have wanted to be seen to take urgent action, but maybe a more considered approach is needed.  Should the first step be to engage with:

  • Plastic product designers and producers;
  • Companies who will ultimately recycle the products;
  • Businesses that will use the recycled plastic products in the manufacture of new products.

One issue that has often plagued the waste sector is the defining the terminology.  Even the classification of “Waste” differs from country to country.

However, two leading global international plastics recycling organisations have worked together to define the term “recyclable” in terms of plastic products and packaging.  In July 2018, Brussels-based Plastic Recyclers Europe (PRE) and the Association of Plastic Recyclers in Washington, USA have concluded that there are four conditions that define a plastic product as being “recyclable”.  These are:

  1. The product must be made with a plastic that is collected for recycling, has market value and/or is supported by a legislatively mandated program;
  2. The product must be sorted and aggregated into defined streams for recycling processes;
  3. The product can be processed and reclaimed/recycled with commercial recycling processes;
  4. The recycled plastic becomes a raw material that is used in the production of new products;

Technology already exists to help with the sorting of plastic waste into defined streams.  Additionally, there is processing equipment available to remove contamination such as metal (Magnetic Separators, Eddy Current Separators, Metal Detectors) and other contaminants (Optical, X-Ray, Infra-Red).

A recent case history report highlighted how EcoVyn, a PVC compounder in the UK, already processes 1000 tonnes of plastic waste each month of which 80% is post-consumer.

Bunting Magnetics Drawer Magnets at Ecovyn

Such clarity of the definition of whether a plastic product is really “recyclable” can only be beneficial, assisting product designers, users and recyclers.  However, it remains unclear whether the EU, UK and other governments will use this new definition when setting their recycling and plastic waste targets.

For further information on metal separation equipment designed for removing metal from plastic waste and in other recycling applications, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

Other Plastic Waste & Recycling Articles

Plastics Positivity at Technivation

Polymer Training and Innovation Centre Hosts UK Plastics Sector Professionals

The Technivation conference, hosted by the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford (18th April 2018), attracted delegates from across the UK plastics sector.

The Polymer Training and Innovation Centre (PITC) provides training for engineers working with plastics and has an extensive range of working equipment including moulding machines, pneumatic conveying systems, and magnetic separators.

Bunting Europe at TechnivationAt Technivation, there were talks from machinery manufacturers and also an industry update from the British Plastics Federation.  BPF Membership Services Director, Stephen Hunt, highlighted a change in the awareness and public perception of plastics since the airing of the BBC Blue Planet II series at the end of 2017.  The BPF have been working hard to clarify misconceptions about plastics, highlighting that plastic is vital in the manufacture of so many products including cars, medical equipment, and IT.  They are presently working closely with the UK Government on the proposed tax for single use plastics, which closes on 18th May 2018.

As Stephen Hunt explained, the plastics sector is the 8th largest exporting industry in the UK with a turnover of £25.5 billion.  The sector is also the 2nd largest employer in the manufacturing industry.  He also highlighted how waste from the USA and European Union combined only contributes 2% to the amount of plastic waste found in our oceans.

Delegates at Technivation had the opportunity to tour the training facility and meet representatives from equipment manufacturers including Summit Systems, Kistler, Arburg, and Staubli.  Tom Higginbottom, Bunting’s Sales Engineer, was demonstrating how to effectively remove metal from the plastics process using a combination of a FF Drawer Filter Magnet and Quicktron Metal Detector.

“At Technivation it was really good to be able to demonstrate how to remove metal and also to show how the equipment is actually installed on a working moulding machine,” explained Tom.  “We supplied the FF Drawer Filter Magnets to PTIC so that the importance of metal removal is included in the training programmes.”

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Bunting Europe at Technivation

Polymer Training and Innovation Centre Protected by Bunting Drawer Filter Magnet

Magnetic Separator Technology for Plastics Training

The Polymer Training & Innovation Centre in Telford has added a Bunting Magnetics Drawer Filter Magnet to the range of equipment at their plastics manufacturing training facility.  The FF Drawer Filter Magnet attracts and captures any fine and coarse magnetically susceptible materials that enter the plastics manufacturing process.

Bunting FF Grate Magnet
A Bunting Magnetics Europe FF Grate Magnet included in a plastics production line at the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford

The Polymer Training & Innovation Centre provides polymer training and consultancy, specialising in injection moulding, blow moulding and extrusion training.  They are a technical training and consultancy business that is owned by City of Wolverhampton College.

At their Telford training facility, the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre has working production-sized plastics manufacturing equipment for injection moulding, blow moulding, thermoforming, materials handling, and a wide range of other important ancillary equipment.

Technical Trainer, Andrew Dermody, explained the importance of trainees having practical training on the equipment.

“We have great support from the industry and equipment manufacturers such as Bunting.  This support means that we can deliver practical training, with a hands-on approach, and that is the best way for our delegates to learn.  Having the Drawer Filter Magnet installed exactly as it would be in a production plant, is an ideal way to show our students best-practice and highlight the importance of metal removal.”

Bunting FF Grate Magnet

The training facility at Telford was refurbished in early 2017 and Bunting supplied the FF Drawer Filter Magnet in March 2018.  The FF Grate Magnet is bolted onto the bottom flange of a Summit Systems fed hopper.  The Magnetic Separator has a transparent front plate so that operators are able to see the material passing through or held within the system.  Virgin plastic beads fall from the hopper through two rows of high strength Tube Magnets, which attract and hold any magnetically susceptible materials.  The Tube Magnets use ultra-strong, permanent, Neodymium Rare Earth Magnets.  The cleaned plastic beads are then fed into the Engel injection moulding machine.  Removing all metal contamination ensures that the final plastic product is free from defects and reduces the amount of waste and potential damage to moulding machines.

Bunting FF Grate Magnet

On a regular frequency, dictated by the amount of metal captured, the Tube Magnets are removed as one complete assembly from the housing and cleaned.  The design of the Drawer Filter Magnet means that removal of the Magnet Assembly is quick and easy, keeping maintenance times to a minimum.

“The Bunting design is good as it is very visible,” said Dermody.  “Often Magnetic Separators are placed out of sight in hoppers, which means that they can be forgotten.  In this installation, the Drawer Filter Magnet is right in front of the machine operator and the clear front allows easy visual checking of the magnets.”

Bunting also supplied Drawer Filter Magnets for use in the classroom and the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre plan to incorporate ‘metal separation’ as one of the course topics.

The Drawer Grate Magnet is widely regarded as standard for the plastics industry and Bunting has supplied thousands to plastics manufacturing operations globally.

“It is great that delegates are able to see, in practice, the importance of having good Magnetic Separation equipment in the plastics process,” said Tom Higginbottom, Bunting’s Sales Engineer.  “Even with virgin raw materials, there is always a small amount of fine ferrous metal contamination and there is always the risk of larger tramp iron that could seriously damage the injection moulding machine.”

On the 18th April 2018, the Polymer Training & Innovation Centre is staging the Technivation event at their recently upgraded training facility in Telford.  During the day there will be a series of short technical presentations, the opportunity to experience their Polymer on-line simulation software, and the chance to meet and talk with primary and secondary equipment suppliers including Bunting Magnetics.  Visitors will be able to learn more about Polymer Apprenticeship’s and Funding and discuss their organisations own training requirements.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Bunting FF Grate Magnet
A Bunting Magnetics Europe FF Grate Magnet included in a plastics production line at the Polymer Training and Innovation Centre in Telford

Contamination Hinders Plastic Recycling

Metal Contamination is Another Problem Facing Plastic Recycling Companies

The environmental impact of poorly managing plastic waste has been in the headlines since the BBC’s Blue Planet II series was aired at the end of 2017.  In January, Theresa May made a pledge to eliminate the UK’s plastic waste by 2042, although the detail of the plan has yet to be unveiled.  Less than a week later and the EU ‘declared war on plastic waste’, announcing the intention to ensure that every piece of packaging on the continent is reusable or recyclable by 2030.

plastic-trash-in-oceans-and-waterways

Presently, there is an unprecedented negative feeling towards plastics.  However, plastic is and will continue to be one of the most versatile and useful materials available.  This versatility is down to the wide range of plastic types, as can be seen in any household.  Plastic is present in food packaging, mobile phone casings, tables, chairs, DVDs, televisions, and many other everyday items that would not exist unless made of plastic.

Certainly, product designers need to give recyclability a higher priority and this change in attitude is required for all materials and not just for plastics.  At present, plastic is the environmental villain.

Effectively managing plastic waste is not a new problem for the UK.  With the introduction of Material Reclamation Facilities (MRFs) in the 1990s, there was an abundance of segregated materials, including plastics, for which there was no end market.  These were stored or exported overseas, and there were reports of warehouses in Germany stocked full of unrecyclable waste materials.

This resulted in changes in the EU definition of ‘waste’ that prevented the easy movement of secondary materials within Europe, but this did not address the main problem.  The market for materials such as secondary plastics did not exist.  Advances have been made and there are products being made out of recycled waste plastics (e.g. furniture) and even plastic roads.

Technology has advanced, but the main problems remain.  Complex recycling plants are now able to separate different types of plastic by colour and type, but the process is not perfect.  To further complicate the problem, other non-related materials, such as metal and even building materials (e.g. concrete and bricks), contaminate the vast majority of waste plastic packaging.

Contaminated Pre-Sorted Waste

Most plastic packaging enters the recycling process as pre-sorted household waste.  The specification of what materials are mixed in a single recycling bag depends on the recycling strategy of the local council and varies considerably across the UK and Europe.

Recycled UK Bunting Magnetic Separators-3On arrival at a MRF, the collected materials are then separated into metal, plastic, cardboard, and any other materials defined within the local strategy.  Separation of these materials is achieved using either technology or, more commonly, a combination of separation equipment and human pickers.  This is a dirty, difficult, and unpopular environment in which to work.

The ability to successfully separate the materials is compromised by the presence of other waste.  These materials have been incorrectly added to recycling bags at the household or during collection and include used-nappies, food waste, paint tins, and other problematic materials.

At the MRF, metal packaging (e.g. steel and aluminium beverage and food cans) is commonly recovered using Overband Magnets positioned over the main feed conveyor prior to the picking line.  Other materials are manually handpicked and stored separately.  Up until recently, the mix of plastic packaging could then be sent to a specialist UK plastic recycling plant or overseas to countries such as China.

Contaminated Plastic Waste

Since 2012, British companies have shipped more than 2.7m tonnes of plastic scrap to mainland China and Hong Kong.  However, this only accounts for two-thirds of all the plastic waste exported from the UK.

Plastic waste sent to China is, where possible, commonly hand-sorted into individual plastic types (i.e. removing plastic tops by hand), with all other added contamination removed manually.  This involves a huge, low-paid workforce.  Similar manually based recycling operations in Europe would be prohibitively costly with unacceptable working conditions.

In December 2017, China announced that in early 2018 it will stop importing “foreign garbage” stating that such waste materials was commonly contaminated with “large amounts of dirty waste or even hazardous wastes”.

Specialist plastic packaging recycling plants in the UK have been under intense financial pressure for many years.  There have been calls for better legislation and Government support, but too many plastic recycling plants open and are then forced to close due to being financial unviable.

A typical plastic recycling operation needs a complex system of separation equipment.  The plant also needs to be able to adapt to huge variations in the nature of the delivered waste plastic.  There are also strict environmental regulations on storing and handling waste plastic.  Such plants are expensive to install and operate.

Hanbury Plastics Bunting Overband Magnet-1

Early in the process, ferrous and non-ferrous metal contamination is removed from the waste plastic using Magnetic Separators and Eddy Current Separators.  Initially, after the plastic is released from the compacted bale, the waste is fed into a primary shredder.  To protect the shredder from damage, an Overband Magnet is suspended across the feed conveyor and removes large ferrous metal.

At this stage, the type of ferrous metal contamination found in the plastic is diverse and often surprising.  It can include metal packaging miss-sorted at the MRF, heavy lumps of iron that increase the weight of the plastic bale, and metal picked up during transportation.  There have even been reports of car engine blocks.  Reasonably sized items of cast iron entering the shredder will cause significant and costly damage and result in the plant being closed until a repair is possible.

After the primary shredder, the waste plastic has been reduced in size and many contaminants liberated.  This shredded waste plastic is fed onto another Magnetic Separator, commonly a Drum Magnet or Pulley Magnet, to remove liberated smaller ferrous metals.

Metal Found in Plastic Recycling Bunting Magnetics-3The type of ferrous metal separated at this stage includes steel spanners, nuts, bolts, screws, fine metal wires, springs, iron shards, fine ferrous dust, and chunks of stainless steel.  Most of the ferrous metal was not part of the original plastic packaging and has been introduced between disposal and processing.

The cleansed plastic waste then passes over an Eddy Current Separator to remove non-ferrous metals.  Commonly separated metals include aluminium beverage cans, foils, tubes, and even window frames.

After the metal contamination has been removed, the plastic waste moves to the next stage in the plant, which could be further separation of contamination or sorting by colour or plastic type.

The high level of metal contamination highlights the challenges facing waste plastic processors.  It was one of many contaminants, not present in the original plastic packaging, that have to be removed.

Before UK and EU Government officials make recycling pledges to pacify environmentalists, they need to consider the practicalities and difficulties faced when processing waste plastic packaging.  Contamination will always be present, and is one of the reasons for exporting this difficult waste material overseas.  Reducing such contamination will make it easier to recycle waste plastic, but there is no clear strategy to achieve this goal at present.

For further information on Bunting Magnetics and Master Magnets and our range of metal separation equipment designed for the waste and recycling sector, please visit our website or contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: press@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

This article was first published by EPPM Magazine (European Plastic Product Manufacturer) in February 2018.

 

Record Number of Exhibitions for Bunting in 2018

Where To Meet Bunting and Master Magnets in 2018

In 2018, the Bunting and Master Magnets team will be exhibiting at 14 industry shows across Europe.

“This will be our most active year for exhibitions,” said Dave Hills, Bunting’s Head of Sales.  “Being visible at exhibitions and congresses in 2016 and 2017 has been really important in building our identity and growing our sales.  We want to take our technology to our potential customers and show them what it can do.”

The full exhibition and congress schedule is:

January

Bunting at IERC Jan 1817th International Electronics Recycling Congress IERC2018 (Salzburg, Austria, 17-19 January).  The first congress of the year focused on E-waste (see the report – Changes in E Waste Management Highlighted at IERC 2018).  There was considerable interest in the Stainless Steel Separator;

April

Ceramitec (Munich, Germany, 10-13 April).  The leading international trade fair for ceramics and non-metallic minerals.  On show will be the Master Magnets range of mineral processing Magnetic Separators;

May

IFAT (Munich, Germany, 14-18 May).  The largest waste and recycling show in Europe.  Bunting now has one of the most complete ranges of Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors for recycling including the:

Bunting Master Magnets at RWM17

June

Hillhead (Hillhead Quarry, Buxton, UK, 26-28 June).  The premier event for the aggregates and quarrying industry in the UK.  Master Magnets has attended for many years, exhibiting their industry-standard Metal Detectors and Overband Magnets;

July

July is a busy month with two exhibitions:

CARS (NAEC, Stoneleigh, UK, 11-12 July).  The Complete Auto Recycling Show focuses on the recovery, dismantling and recycling of the car.  Separating the metals is a vital stage of the process where companies use the Stainless Steel Separator, Eddy Current Separators, and Scrap Drum Magnets;

WasteExpo (Warwickshire Exhibition Centre, near Leamington Spa, UK 5th July).  The waste and skip trade exhibition run by Skip Hire Magazine where we are headline sponsors alongside Master Magnets.

September

RWM (NEC, Birmingham, UK, 12-13 September).  The largest waste and recycling exhibition in the UK.  Bunting and Master Magnets have been long-term supporters of the show and will have working Magnetic Separators on the stand.

October

Fakuma (Friedrichshafen, Germany, 16-20 October).  One of the leading plastics technology events in the world.  Bunting will be exhibiting Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors used to remove metal contamination during the virgin plastic production process and also separators used during plastics recycling.

November

This will be a busy month for overseas exhibitions with events in Italy and France.

Ecomondo (Rimini, Italy, 6-9 November).  An international event with an innovative format that brings together all sectors of the circular economy in a single platform: from material and energy recovery to sustainable development.  The show is the ideal platform to promote Magnetic Separation equipment used in the recycling sector and we will be supporting our new representative, Ital Goods.;

Emballage (Paris, France, 26-29 November).  The international trade show gathers together industry stakeholders from the food, liquids, cosmetics, beauty, luxury goods, healthcare, pharmaceutical, retail and consumer goods sectors, offering them 4 days of meetings, demonstrations, innovation and presentations.  We will be on the stand of our local distributor, Pronix.  Magnetic Separators and Metal Detectors are used extensively in the processing industries;

Pollutec (Lyon, France, 27-30 November).  The international trade show for environmental and energy stakeholders working for economic performance.  The final recycling focused event of 2018 and we will be supporting our local distributor BMS France;

December

img_1144Plast Eurasia (Istanbul, Turkey, 5-8 December).  The major plastic show for Turkey and the Middle East.  Bunting has exhibited previously and will be helping visitors solve their metal contamination problems.  As in 2016, we will be on the stand of our local representative Tepro Makine.

“It is an ambitious and exhibiting exhibition schedule for 2018,” explained Dave.  “With the Master Magnets product range we are now able to offer total metal separation solutions.  Attending leading industry exhibitions is vital to understand the needs of the industry and demonstrate how we can help.”

For further information on any of the listed exhibitions or any aspect of Metal Separation or Detection, please contact us on:

Phone: +44 (0) 1442 875081
Email: sales@buntingeurope.com
Via the website

 

 

 

 

Is Plastic the Recycling Pantomime Villain?

Pressure Grows on Plastics and the Environment

In 2017 the media has gradually increased the pressure on the plastics industry by highlighting the effect of waste plastic in our global environment.  This focus shows no sign of going away, with the UN oceans chief stating that Ocean plastic is a ‘planetary crisis’.  

plastic-trash-in-oceans-and-waterways

Ironically, in many cases plastics are primarily used because they reduce weight and thus save energy and our natural resources.  Plastic packaging also significantly reduces food waste by keeping it fresh and is used when transporting food around the globe.

The world’s first fully synthetic plastic dates back to 1907 when the material bakelite was invented in New York by Leo Baekeland.  He also coined the term ‘plastics’.  Since then plastic has become one of the most versatile and used materials on the planet.

So why have we fallen out of love with plastic?

In July, we reported that academics were predicting that there would be 12 million metric tonnes of plastic being in landfill or the natural environment by 2050.  The recent David Attenborough nature series Blue Planet II shown on BBC1 has shown how waste plastic is found in our oceans, even reaching the depths of the Mariana Trench.

However, as highlighted by the British Plastics Federation at the UK’s waste and recycling show RWM (held in Birmingham, UK September 2017), the ‘plastic waste’ problem is complicated.

bunting_metal_separation_module_recapture_plastics-7611The fundamental global problem is that 2 million people do not have access to solid waste collection (United Nations).  The properties of plastic that make it so useful in our everyday lives also makes it difficult to breakdown and easy to get blown and transported away from the rubbish dump and into the local environment.  Gradually, this plastic waste will migrate down to the sea.

The larger problem is the origin of plastic waste.  In the developed world of the USA and Europe, investment in research and technology means that those countries only contribute approximately 2% of the plastic found in oceans.  82% is estimated to originate in Asia (The British Plastics Federation).

The problem is not just a ‘plastic waste’ issue but a ‘waste’ issue in general.  Plastic is not the only product being thrown away and ending up in our oceans.  Industrial waste is a huge problem, but is presently not the focus of attention.  In many developing countries dealing with waste is simply not their most important problem to address.  Malnutrition, housing, transport, jobs are all higher on the list of priorities.

Plastic has become waste’s ‘pantomime villain’.

This global problem needs a global solution.  There is no doubt that the designers of plastic products have a huge responsibility and need to consider the consequences of ideas such as introducing plastic microbeads into cosmetic products.

Bunting BPI-6151In the UK, we presently recycle 29% of our plastic and our target for 2020 is 57%.  The figure is so low due to the complexity of the process and economics.  Magnetic Separators, Eddy Current Separators and Metal Detectors remove metal and there is other technology to sort by colour and plastic type.  However, producing a useful plastic from waste that can be introduced as a raw material into primary plastic production (such as happens with aluminium and steel) is presently exceptionally difficult.  Until that happens, plastic waste will continue to pose a problem.

For further information on separating metal from plastics during the production of the virgin product or during the recycling process, please contact the Bunting team on:

Other articles on Plastics Recycling include: